<p>NASA engineer Ernie Wright gazes at six mirror segments destined to become part of the <a href="http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/">James Webb Space Telescope</a>. Taken April 14, the picture shows the mirrors being prepped for cryogenic testing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.</p><p>Once launched, the infrared telescope will be 930,000 miles (1,500,000 kilometers) from Earth and will work at temperatures as cold as -390 degrees F (-234 degrees C).</p>

Mirror Image

NASA engineer Ernie Wright gazes at six mirror segments destined to become part of the James Webb Space Telescope. Taken April 14, the picture shows the mirrors being prepped for cryogenic testing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Once launched, the infrared telescope will be 930,000 miles (1,500,000 kilometers) from Earth and will work at temperatures as cold as -390 degrees F (-234 degrees C).

Photograph courtesy NASA

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