<p><b>1963 American Everest Expedition</b></p> <p>“It’s the ultimate expression of an endurance sport now. And that is different than the mountaineering culture that it was in our time.”</p> <p>When four of his 1963 teammates were missing on Everest, Dingman, a surgeon, forfeited his own chance to summit to find and then care for them. The team later received the National Geographic Society’s highest honor, the Hubbard Medal.</p> <p><b>Home:</b> Salt Lake City, Utah</p>

Dave Dingman, 76

1963 American Everest Expedition

“It’s the ultimate expression of an endurance sport now. And that is different than the mountaineering culture that it was in our time.”

When four of his 1963 teammates were missing on Everest, Dingman, a surgeon, forfeited his own chance to summit to find and then care for them. The team later received the National Geographic Society’s highest honor, the Hubbard Medal.

Home: Salt Lake City, Utah

Photograph by Cory Richards

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