<p>Kilian Jornet, our 2014 People’s Choice Adventurer of the Year, has continued his streak of outrageous “sky-running” speed records with an ascent and descent of 20,237-foot Mount McKinley (Denali) in 11 hours, 48 minutes. He beat the fastest known time on North America’s highest peak by five hours. Most parties approach the climb as a 17- to 21-day expedition.</p><p>Jornet also set a new course record of 22 hours, 41 minutes, and 33 seconds on the Hardrock 100, in which competitors run a hundred miles through Colorado’s San Juan Mountains, climbing and descending 33,992 feet. Next up: Mount Elbrus, Aconcagua, Everest.</p><p><a href="http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/adventurers-of-the-year/2014/kilian-jornet-burgada/" target="_blank">See Jornet’s 2014 Adventurers of the Year profile &gt;&gt;</a></p><p><a href="http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/adventurers-of-the-year/2014/kilian-jornet-photos/" target="_blank">See his Instagram adventures &gt;&gt;</a></p><p><a href="http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/adventurers-of-the-year/2014/kilian-jornet-video/" target="_blank">Watch Jornet accept the 2014 People’s Choice award &gt;&gt;</a></p>

Sky Runner Kilian Jornet

Kilian Jornet, our 2014 People’s Choice Adventurer of the Year, has continued his streak of outrageous “sky-running” speed records with an ascent and descent of 20,237-foot Mount McKinley (Denali) in 11 hours, 48 minutes. He beat the fastest known time on North America’s highest peak by five hours. Most parties approach the climb as a 17- to 21-day expedition.

Jornet also set a new course record of 22 hours, 41 minutes, and 33 seconds on the Hardrock 100, in which competitors run a hundred miles through Colorado’s San Juan Mountains, climbing and descending 33,992 feet. Next up: Mount Elbrus, Aconcagua, Everest.

See Jornet’s 2014 Adventurers of the Year profile >>

See his Instagram adventures >>

Watch Jornet accept the 2014 People’s Choice award >>

Photograph by Kilian Jornet

10th Anniversary Adventurer Updates

Where Are They Now? Over the last ten years we've celebrated a hundred adventurers—some of the world's best and brightest. We caught up with some of our previous Adventurer of the Year honorees to see how they have continued to raise the bar, redefine the limits, and explore places unknown.

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