How Japan Undermines Efforts to Stop the Illegal Ivory Trade

As China cracks down on ivory sales, legal loopholes in Japan—the world’s largest market—offer opportunities for smugglers.

Photograph by Brent Stirton, Getty for National Geographic
Read Caption
Masters of the shamisen—a traditional stringed instrument—use an ivory bridge and pick to produce what they say is a superior sound. “It’s a very slight difference that experts alone can hear,” says Sayo ne-san, a geisha at the Asakusa Geisha Union, in Tokyo. Japan has consumed ivory from more than 260,000 elephants since 1970.
Photograph by Brent Stirton, Getty for National Geographic

Like thousands of other Tokyo visitors on a recent summer day, we beelined for Asakusa, a popular tourist district. My companion and I were drawn not by the neighborhood’s famous Buddhist temple or its renowned geisha shows but by ivory. Banned in much of the world, here in Japan ivory is still sold openly and legally.

Scroll down to read in Japanese. スクロールして日本語で読む。

The hunt didn’t take long. Weaving through selfie-snapping crowds, past the thunderous booms of a live drum band and the tantalizing smells of freshly baked takoyaki, we stopped at random at a shop to ask for directions. We’d heard that a particular jewelry store nearby sold Chinese-style ivory jewelry. The shopkeeper shook his head: He didn’t think that place was around anymore.

“But if it’s ivory you’re looking for,” he said, “I can help you.”

Though his shop specialized in coral, he reached into a back drawer and pulled out a necklace. The intricate, matchbox-size carving dangling from its cord depicted Kannon, the Buddhist goddess of mercy, her swirling skirts surrounded by a dragon’s tight coils and a spray of phoenix feathers.

“Zoge,” the shopkeeper said, pointing to the creamy white material. Ivory. He was asking just $450—a steal.

It was very beautiful, I admitted, putting it around my friend’s neck and snapping a photo. I told the shopkeeper that I’d heard it was against the law to take ivory out of Japan. Wouldn’t we run into trouble getting it back to New York City?

“If you show this to Customs, no, not OK,” the shopkeeper said after a pause. “But many people from New York take ivory back to the United States.”

To demonstrate how this was done, he pointed at my purse and motioned inside, as though concealing something within. “Or just put it in your shirt for taking back to New York,” he said, patting his collar. “Perhaps it’s OK.”

After we demurred, the shopkeeper nevertheless handed me his business card. “Nine a.m. tomorrow, we’re open!”

International ivory trade has been banned since 1990, but exchanges like this are why countries and territories around the world—including the U.S., U.K., France, and Taiwan—have been issuing near-total domestic ivory bans. Michael Gove, British secretary of state for the environment, food and rural affairs, says the U.K.’s ban, expected to take effect in 2019, “is one of the most effective ways we can contribute to ensuring the horrific decline in African elephant numbers is reversed.”

No matter how supposedly tight the controls, legal trade in ivory seems inevitably to serve as a smoke screen for illegal dealings. China—the world’s preeminent source of demand for ivory and the predominant driver behind much of Africa’s elephant poaching—was widely praised for closing its market in January.

China’s decision meant that Japan suddenly inherited the dubious distinction of being the world’s largest legal ivory market. Though long overlooked as a source of illegal trade, evidence is emerging that “the last ivory ban haven,” as conservationists have dubbed Japan, is just as vulnerable to abuse.

“To many people in the world, it seems that Japanese people are generally keen to comply with the law, but in reality that’s not the case,” says Masayuki Sakamoto, an environmental lawyer and the executive director of the Japan Tiger and Elephant Fund (JTEF), a nonprofit organization based in Tokyo.

View Images

In 2011 authorities in Kenya burned five tons of ivory—including many blank hankos, or name seals, the main ivory product in Japan—recovered from a seizure in Singapore.

Investigations conducted by JTEF and other groups have revealed regulations riddled with loopholes that ivory traders readily exploit, including by fraudulently registering tusks, sending ivory abroad or—as I saw—offering ivory to customers who they believe intend to take it across borders illegally. From 2011 to 2016, Traffic, the wildlife trade monitoring group, tallied 2.4 tons of seized ivory leaking out of Japan, almost all bound for China.

In light of such findings, pressure is building for Japan to join the rest of the world in closing its domestic ivory market. “We’ve been slaughtering elephants since Roman times, but we can end ivory trade now,” says Peter Knights, CEO of WildAid, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco. “That would be a tremendous achievement for the human race—and Japan could be leading it.”

But Japanese officials are sticking to a decades-long stance that their ivory market complies with sustainable trade and is controlled tightly enough to be exempt from calls for bans. As Masaru Horikami, director of the Ministry of the Environment’s Wildlife Division, says, “Japan is not being blamed for poaching, so at this point the Japanese government is not thinking about closing the ivory market.” He and his colleagues most recently dismissed a recommendation by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the treaty organization that regulates the global wildlife trade, that all countries whose domestic ivory markets spur poaching or illegal trade close them.

Predicting if or how Japan’s ongoing ivory trade will affect the survival of elephants is very difficult, says Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, D.C., and author of The Extinction Market. “Does ivory leaking from Japan to China satisfy existing demand, or does it boost demand so there’s more poaching of elephants in Africa? These are enormously complex questions,” she says. “What we do know, though, is that regulations in Japan are not adequate to prevent illegal export of ivory.”

As poaching rages on in Africa, some experts fear that those inadequate regulations will allow Japan to become the next leading destination for laundering ivory from recently killed elephants.

JAPAN’S BOOMING MARKET

View Images

These giants in Kenya's Tsavo East National Park represent some of Africa's last great tuskers—elephants whose massive tusks weigh in at about a hundred pounds or more.

Ivory trade has made elephants walking targets since time immemorial, but the past century has seen their populations in Africa plunge from about 10 million a century ago to an estimated 400,000 to 500,000 today. Savanna elephants suffered a 30 percent loss from 2007 to 2014, and thousands continue to be poached for their tusks each year.

Pull Quote
Japan bears the strongest moral responsibility for having re-triggered the mass slaughter of elephants.
Allan Thornton, Environmental Investigation Agency

China’s appetite for ivory has been the primary cause of today’s crisis, but Japan helped set the stage. Japan has consumed ivory from at least 262,500 elephants since 1970, the vast majority from large, mature adults, according to Allan Thornton, president of the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), a nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. Japan’s ivory appetite fueled catastrophic poaching during the 1970s and 1980s, when African elephant populations were slashed by 50 percent.

Since the 1990 ban, Japanese officials have pushed to reopen the international trade, and in 1999 and 2008 they partly succeeded by instigating one-off ivory sales to replenish Japan’s domestic market. (China’s inclusion in the second sale best explains the most recent upsurge in elephant poaching and ivory trafficking, according to a working paper published by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and Princeton University.)

“Japan bears the strongest moral responsibility for having re-triggered the mass slaughter of elephants by leading efforts to dismantle the ban,” Thornton says. “Dismantling that ban through the two CITES-approved ivory sales was a catastrophic error that allowed industrial-level poaching to reignite.”

Japan’s ivory industry today, Thornton adds, is “greater than any other nation on Earth.” While China had some 170 ivory outlets nationwide prior to its ban, Japan has 8,200 retailers, 300 manufacturers, and 500 wholesalers.

On their website, Japanese ivory traders refer to their craft as “an indispensable traditional industry.” But in actuality, ivory was introduced to Japan relatively recently, and its use has shifted with the whims of the day.

“We don’t have sophisticated traditional carving like China,” says Tetsuji Ida, an author and journalist at Kyodo News who has reported on ivory since 1992. “The ivory-as-cultural-heritage argument is false.”

View Images

A collection of modern netsuke at the Kyoto Seishu Netsuke Art Museum. The museum sponsors an annual competition for the best new netsuke and hosts networking events to try to reinvigorate interest in this fading traditional art.

Ivory found its way to Japan in the 1500s as an adornment for high-end furniture for feudal lords and aristocrats, as well as for musical instrument parts and tea ceremony utensils. But its popularity took off during the Edo period, from the 1600s to the mid-1800s, when Japan’s new merchant class began using it to make hair ornaments, tobacco containers, and tiny accessories called netsuke.

Kimonos have no pockets, so netsuke—which always contain a string hole—were indispensable for fastening small purses to the wearer’s obi belt. As kimono culture grew more sophisticated, fashionistas would coordinate their netsuke—the most favored of which were made of ivory—to match a particular season or event.

“By the late Edo period, even commoners probably had at least one piece of ivory crafts,” says Kinue Asayama, general manager of the Kiyomizu Sannenzaka Museum, in Kyoto. “People cherished it as a luxury.”

When Japan opened its doors to the West in 1853 and transitioned into the Meiji period, demand for ivory escalated, thanks to foreign visitors who loved Japanese arts and crafts. A new ivory carving industry sprang up to mass produce sculptures of elegant women, humble countryfolk, and smiling children. “As demand got bigger, the ivory pieces got bigger,” Asayama says. “Western merchants came to buy ivory sculptures, and Japanese art dealers established branches outside of the country.”

For the Japanese, however, ivory was losing its luster. As westernization came into vogue, netsuke, Buddhist sculptures, antiques, and other ivory trinkets were sold to foreigners, and most new products were manufactured specifically for export. This came to an end when World War II broke out, but the ivory market, rather than fade into oblivion, evolved soon after the fighting ended. Tobacco was its new entry point.

NEW USES FOR IVORY

Kyoichiro Tsuge, a pipemaker, had just returned from the front line after WWII when he seized on a business opportunity. Almost everyone in Japan smoked, but the paper cigarettes the Americans supplied lacked filters, making them difficult to enjoy until the very end. Ivory cigarette holders, Tsuge realized, were the answer. Ivory didn’t burn, and because a tusk is nothing more than an elephant’s tooth, it produced a pleasant teeth-on-teeth feel when held in the smoker’s mouth. The fad spread quickly.

Tsuge expanded during the 1950s, putting his 120 carvers to work making souvenir ivory pipes for the thousands of Americans stationed in Tokyo. Decorated with Japanese motifs such as Mount Fuji, maiko (geisha in training), and dragons, the pipes—which cost $30 to $50, about a month’s salary for an average Japanese at the time—proved best sellers. Tsuge often sent his son, Kyozaburo, to make weekly deliveries to the U.S. entertainment palace in Ginza, a place normally prohibited for Japanese.

Demand for ivory pipes dried up after the Americans left, and paper filters replaced cigarette holders. But once again the industry conceived of a new use for ivory—one that has since served as the driving force behind Japan’s consumption.

Hikaru Sakamoto, a traveling salesman from Yamanashi Prefecture, was selling jewelry to wealthy households when he noticed that his customers made expensive purchases using low-quality wooden hankos, or signature name stamps. Given that everyone in Japan needs a hanko, luxury hankos, Sakamoto realized, could be an even bigger profitmaker than jewelry.

In 1967 Sakamoto founded Soke Nihon Insou Kyokai, a hanko company specializing in ivory. Although he wasn’t the first to produce ivory hankos, he did pioneer an ingenious marketing scheme. Some Japanese believe that certain high-quality hankos can positively influence their fate, and Sakamoto capitalized on this superstition by taking out ads claiming that because elephants live long lives in tightly knit family groups, people who own ivory hankos will enjoy similar longevity, fortune, and harmony. What the “Diamond Is Forever” campaign did later for engagement rings in the West, Sakamoto’s ivory message did for hankos in Japan.

“Very much like eating whale meat, using ivory hankos was something made by industries and PR agencies,” Tetsuji Ida says. “Definitely this is not our culture, not our tradition, and has no relation with a principle of sustainable use.” (By “sustainable use” he means trade in animals and their parts that doesn’t harm their populations.)

Indeed, the booming hanko trade came at the expense of African elephants, which by this time were being slaughtered en masse for their tusks. In 1982 Japan overtook Hong Kong as the world’s largest ivory consumer, importing more than 2,700 tons of ivory—the equivalent of 120,000 elephants—in a single decade. An estimated 70 percent of Japan’s ivory at that time was illegal, from poached elephants, and at least half of it was being used to churn out more than two million hankos annually.

“In the 1980s Japan was so notorious, not only in terms of the volume of ivory it consumed but also for illegal trade,” says Isao Sakaguchi, a professor of international relations and global environmental governance at Gakushuin University, in Tokyo. “Japan was responsible for the near extinction of African elephants in most of their range states.”

News of the poaching crisis didn’t connect with many ivory hanko producers and users, however. Africa and its problems seemed a world away, and, according to Sakaguchi, by the time poached tusks reached Japan, they’d been laundered into legality, often through fraudulent permits issued by exporters in Africa or Hong Kong.

Takashi Mochizuki, the representative of his family’s company, Mochizuki Mitsugu Shoten, a major hanko distributor, still shudders when recalling the day 30 years ago that a French television crew showed up at his business in Rokugo, a town famous throughout Japan for its hanko production. “When they started broadcasting, they first showed hanko stores in this neighborhood, but soon after that, they showed images of dead elephants!” Mochizuki says. “That was something I couldn’t accept.”

View Images

Rangers in Kenya removed the tusks of this bull elephant killed by a spear to prevent the ivory from entering the illegal trade.

More reporters began turning up after that, all “with an intention to show Japan as the place where ivory from elephants killed by poachers ends up,” he says. But, he adds, for him and his neighbors, elephants are “a precious, holy thing. Our tradition is not killing animals but just taking ivory from ones that died naturally somewhere. We’re not part of that elephant-killing business.” To this day Mochizuki and others in the ivory industry stand by that assertion.

With press coverage of the poaching crisis reaching a fever pitch in the late 1980s, the Japanese government finally relented. In June 1989, four months before the international ivory ban went into effect, Japan temporarily halted ivory imports. Industry representatives pressured officials to oppose heightened protections for African elephants at a 1989 CITES meeting, but the best they could do, government officials said, was abstain from voting.

“The tragedy for African elephants started in 1989, when the Conference of the Parties at CITES supported the blanket ban of ivory,” says Yoshio Kaneko, a member of the CITES Secretariat from 1985 to 1990 and an adviser to the Japanese government on ivory and other wildlife-related issues. “Southern African countries that had succeeded in conserving elephants through sustainable use of ivory lost income and were unjustly penalized.”

Pull Quote
History tells us that it’s impossible to control trade at a level that doesn’t drive elephants toward extinction.
Masayuki Sakamoto, Japan Tiger and Elephant Fund

Rather than implementing a blanket ban, Kaneko says, countries with healthy elephant populations should have been allowed to continue to trade ivory and use the proceeds from those sales for conservation. “They lost income that otherwise they were able to receive on a regular basis and invest in long-term management programs,” he says. “I don’t want to see countries with conservation success stories penalized by others.”

According to the Ministry of Environment’s Masaru Horikami, trade in ivory is “about following the spirit of CITES” concerning sustainable trade of wildlife. Legal ivory sales can play an important role in motivating communities in southern Africa to conserve elephants, agrees Nobuo Ishii, an ecologist and conservationist at Tokyo Woman’s Christian University and a member of the Japanese CITES delegation since 1989. “If we close our market, we cannot help African countries anymore.”

JTEF’s Masayuki Sakamoto has heard these claims for 30 years. He rejects the idea that a legal ivory trade can help save elephants. “Ishii and other ivory trade advocates just repeat abstract principles, like ‘Range states should be supported,’ and ‘If animals lose their value, incentive for conservation is decreased,’” he says. “On a theoretical level, yes, I agree that there are many options for sustainable use of wildlife, but for ivory these opinions do not stand up to reality. History tells us that it’s impossible to control trade at a level that doesn’t drive elephants toward extinction.”

Tetsuji Ida agrees. “No one can claim there is no illegal ivory market in Japan,” he says. But sustainable use of ivory and other wildlife products continues to be “a principle of the Japanese government.”

ONGOING FIGHT

For Sakamoto, the celebration over the 1990 ivory ban was short-lived. Known by some as the godfather of ivory issues in Japan, he has watched ivory dealers there lobby the government to reopen international trade ever since.

One of the loudest voices belongs to the Japan Federation of Ivory Arts and Crafts Associations, a group of ivory-manufacturing businesses, many of them family run. Some have roots dating to the late 1800s, when the group arose to help facilitate the logistically tricky task of sourcing ivory from Africa and India. Today the association’s 50 or so members control much of the legal trade and manufacturing of ivory in Japan and, according to Sakamoto, enjoy a close relationship with the government.

View Images

Masayuki Sakamoto, executive director of the Japan Tiger and Elephant Fund, has been investigating the ivory trade in Japan since the early 1990s. He’s one of the loudest voices calling for the country to close its ivory market.

Sakamoto conducted his own research on Japan’s lax trade controls—but his findings were no match for international politics. In 1997 at a CITES conference in Harare, Zimbabwe’s president, Robert Mugabe—goaded by Japanese officials and industry representatives—pressured other governmental attendees to support an ivory sale to Japan. When the proposal passed, Sakamoto watched in defeat as the Zimbabweans burst out with their national anthem and the Japanese leaped from their chairs with fists clenched in triumph.

“I was sorry that my effort was not enough,” Sakamoto says. “We had failed to stop Japan from undermining the international ivory ban.”

After the meeting, he visited Chobe National Park in Botswana, where he saw African elephants in the wild for the first time—an experience that still conjures strong emotions in him. During a safari in an open vehicle, the matriarch of a family of elephants—threatened when the car cut between the elephants—charged.

“The earth actually shook,” Sakamoto recalls. “I felt that I would be killed and that if I was, it was fate because I couldn’t work hard enough for the elephants.” The driver reversed just in time, and Sakamoto, shaken, made a silent vow: “In my heart I told the elephants that I will continue to fight for them.”

That fight has been a formidable challenge. Almost immediately after CITES approved the first ivory sale, of 50 tons, to Japan in 1997, Japanese officials began lobbying for a repeat event. This time, though, Japan wasn’t alone. Now China—which previously had resigned itself to allowing its ivory industry to fade—began to seek the right to resume trade.

“Japan and China have always had a very frictional, competitive relationship,” says Grace Ge Gabriel, the Asia regional director at the International Fund for Animal Welfare, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit animal welfare and conservation group. “If you keep giving ivory to Japan and ignoring China—well, as a Chinese, I also felt it was not fair to favor Japan over China.”

But Gabriel also knew that allowing the second sale would be “a disaster for elephants.” Her research showed that China’s market was grossly underprepared—and that Japan’s ivory regulations were even worse. Once again, such concerns were dismissed, and despite protests from 20 African elephant range states, the second sale was held in 2008, with 62 tons of ivory going to China and 39 to Japan. The poaching crisis immediately ignited, and China has dominated ivory headlines ever since.

Yet Gabriel, Sakamoto, and others fear that Japan is a slumbering giant in terms of its potential for illegal trade—one that may reawaken now that China has closed its market. “Illegal ivory dealers will definitely try to find a new legalized market to be used as cover,” Sakamoto says. “Japan should prepare for that.”

Unlike in the West, where ivory became a stigmatized symbol of death and greed after the 1990 global trade ban, in Japan ivory’s image was tarnished but not destroyed. “Most consumers here don’t recognize the domestic ivory issue,” Sakaguchi says, referring to regulatory loopholes and illegal trade. “The level of awareness is still very low for Japanese people.”

In China, ivory symbolizes wealth and prestige. In Japan, it’s “not about showing off status but about everyday use,” says Airi Yamawaki, co-founder of Tears of the African Elephant, a nonprofit organization based in Tokyo and Nairobi.

Number and value of ivory transactions each year in Yahoo! Japan auctions

28,407

$6,225,508

$3,820,709

16,368

3,846

Transactions

$588,720

‘13

‘15

‘09

‘11

‘07

‘17

2005

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND; OANDA

28,407

$6,225,508

Number and value of ivory transactions each year in Yahoo! Japan auctions

$3,820,709

16,368

3,846

Transactions

$588,720

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND; OANDA

The continued interest Japanese have in ivory is further obscured by the fact that much of the trade now happens online. According to a JTEF analysis, the number of closing bids for ivory on Yahoo! Japan auctions rose steadily from fewer than 4,000 in 2005 to more than 28,000 in 2015, dipping to a still significant 16,000 in 2017. (The drop was likely a result of negative media attention surrounding ivory and increased policing by Yahoo! Japan, which is not controlled by Yahoo Inc.) A 2015 JTEF and EIA single-day survey of Yahoo! Japan and Rakuten, a popular e-commerce site, likewise revealed some 12,200 ads for ivory.

Ivory tea ceremony utensils, musical instrument parts, Buddhist prayer beads, and jewelry are still produced in Japan, but much of the enduring interest traces back to the original hanko PR blitz. With its stock of around 700,000 ivory name seals, the hanko industry is responsible for an estimated 80 percent of current ivory consumption. Hanko use has declined in daily life since the 1980s, but when it comes to big life events—purchasing a house, getting married, or inheriting property—name seals are still a necessity. For many, ivory remains the “premier grand guru” and “king” of hanko materials—as the industry aggressively advertises.

“HUGE LOOPHOLES”

According to Japanese authorities, hankos and other ivory products sold in Japan are either antiques or legally made from tusks imported before the 1990 ban or from the two sales. That Japan’s market is suddenly under attack by conservationists is unfair, they say, because ivory regulations here are on a par with, if not better than, those elsewhere.

View Images

Masayuki Sakamoto browses ads for illegal ivory on Yahoo! Japan’s retail site, which is not controlled by Yahoo Inc. Japanese law requires that whole tusks be registered with the government and that registration documents be displayed—which this ad doesn’t do. A number of prominent Japanese e-commerce sites and businesses have banned ivory, but Yahoo! Japan says it has no intention of following suit.

“The Japanese trade policy is the same as other countries,” says Junya Nakano, director of the Office of Trade Licensing for Wild Animals and Plants at the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. “We prohibit international trade of ivory and allow only some very small exceptional cases of domestic trade in pre-convention [trade ban] and one-off sale ivory.”

Japan’s problem, according to Hirochika Namekawa, principal deputy director of the Global Environment Division at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, is one not of ivory controls but of communication. “Maybe it’s a matter of Japan not being as good at public relations as other countries,” he says. “But in terms of regulations, Japan is very strict, just like the U.K. and U.S.”

Other countries, however, have enacted or are in the process of enacting near-total ivory trade bans. “The extent of ivory sales in Japan is an order of magnitude greater than the U.S. and U.K,” says author and researcher Felbab-Brown. For Japanese officials to compare their ivory trade controls with the U.S. or U.K., EIA’s Allan Thornton adds, is “a preposterous and unsubstantiated claim.”

For one thing, Japan requires that only whole tusks intended for commercial trade be registered with the government. Ivory hankos, carvings, and trinkets are not regulated. Nor are cut pieces. This is why, Thornton says, many past shipments of illegal ivory seized en route to Japan have contained tusks cut into two or three pieces; once those pieces make it into the country, no controls exist to prevent them from being sold.

Japan’s international postal system also works in traffickers’ favor because it exempts imported items with a declared value under $2,000 from normal regulations. Ivory detected in one of those shipments is not seized. Instead, if left unclaimed, it’s returned to the sender. During the past few years, Japanese customs have mailed back hundreds of pieces of ivory, including sculptures from China, cut pieces from Nigeria and Zimbabwe, and tusks from France, according to Japan Customs.

View Images

An anti-ivory poster at an Earth Day event in Tokyo. The Japanese public responds best to softer messages, preferring not to be confronted with images of butchered elephants or statistics about African rangers killed protecting wildlife, according to Airi Yamawaki, co-founder of Tears of the African Elephant. “There’s a phrase here: ‘Put a lid on something that smells,’” she says. “That’s exactly what we do for ivory.”

Because of these “huge loopholes,” Tetsuji Ida says, Japan “cannot say with 100 percent confidence that we don’t use any illegal ivory coming from African countries.”

As for whole tusks, should one be smuggled into Japan, all an unscrupulous trader needs do to exempt it from domestic laws, and thus make it legal, is cut it in half. But there’s no real need for that, Sakamoto says, because legalizing a tusk in Japan for commercial sale, regardless of its origin, is easy. Owners don’t have to prove their tusk’s age with a receipt or carbon dating analysis, nor are they required to bring it in for a physical inspection. Instead they fill out an application form, take a few photos, and get a friend or even a family member to provide a written statement vouching for the fact that they saw the tusk in the registrant’s home before 1990. The system, Sakamoto says, is the equivalent of “official laundering.”

Number of tusks registered each year with the Japan Wildlife Research Center

3,664

A dramatic increase in the number of tusks registered in 2009 followed the approval in 2008 by CITES of a sale of 39 tons of ivory to Japan.

1,687

Tusks

252

‘15

‘16

2005

‘07

‘09

‘11

‘13

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT, JAPAN; JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND

3,664

Number of tusks registered each year with the

Japan Wildlife Research Center

A dramatic increase in the number of tusks registered in 2009 followed the approval in 2008 by CITES of a sale of 39 tons of ivory to Japan.

1,687

252

Tusks

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT, JAPAN; JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND

Concerned that the number of whole tusks registered in Japan has been steadily rising—from just 408 in 2006 to 1,687 in 2016—Sakamoto and his investigative partner, Kumi Togawa, wanted to see just how easy it is to get away with laundering an illegal one. In 2015 they teamed up with EIA and hired an investigator, who called the Japan Wildlife Research Center, the nongovernmental body tasked with overseeing tusk registration, to say that she wished to register a tusk inherited from her father. She believed he acquired it around the year 2000, however, making it illegal. Rather than deter her, the agent told the investigator to say, for example, that she had seen the tusk in her father’s house in 1985, and he coached her about what to write to ensure “there would be no doubt, no problem.” He even offered to proofread her application.

Sticking to the same story about the inherited tusk, the investigator next called ivory dealers who make a business of purchasing registered whole tusks from citizens and reselling them to manufacturers. Thirty of 37 dealers suggested illegal activities, including a desire to buy the unregistered ivory directly or to help the investigator fraudulently register the tusk using fake, third-party testimonials. As a buyer from one of the largest ivory companies in Japan reassured her, “I’ve done over 500 to 600 of these cases, and no one has ever been questioned about the third party’s statement, not even once.”

Thornton was genuinely surprised by the high number of businesses willing to break the law—“When we started, I thought we’d find three or four bad apples,” he says—but ivory trade advocates were dismissive. “I don’t understand why people insist ivory regulations must be 100 percent perfect,” says Kaneko, the government adviser.

The government never responded directly to JTEF or EIA about their findings. But in early 2017 a tusk registration official at the Japan Wildlife Research Center raised alarms after discovering a number of suspiciously similar applications. Though the applicants supposedly had no connection, the carpet in the photos looked the same, the testimonials were all written in matching fonts, and the stories about the tusks’ acquisitions were nearly indistinguishable.

An investigation led the Tokyo police to two ivory wholesale companies, Raftel and Flawless, and they seized 27 unregistered tusks the companies had tried to fraudulently register on behalf of sellers. Company officials insisted, however, that they were innocent because they’d received permission from the Japan Wildlife Research Center to collect ivory prior to registration so they could ensure its authenticity. The prosecutor accepted the explanation, dismissing the cases and returning the seized tusks, according to JTEF's Sakamoto, the Japanese media, and the Tokyo police.

To the ire of some officials, the cases were widely covered by the Japanese press. “It’s really disappointing and upsetting that these kinds of illegal transactions are picked up by the media and publicized as if the Japanese legal ivory market had all these murky areas,” says Reiji Kamezawa, director of the Nature Conservation Bureau at the Ministry of the Environment. “I really don’t think we deserve that kind of criticism.”

Ivory industry executives similarly insist that they’re victims of an environmentalist and media witch hunt. At a 2017 hanko trade fair in Tokyo, Takaichi Ivory Company, Japan’s largest hanko manufacturer, posted a notice complaining about the “relentless harassment and pressure” from conservation groups. It was a brazen assertion, considering that Kageo Takaichi, the company’s chairman and the former director of the Japan Federation of Ivory Arts and Crafts Associations, along with his son, were prosecuted in 2011 for illegally trading 58 tusks. The business was fined around $9,000, and Takaichi and his son were given suspended sentences of three and two years, respectively.

Takaichi didn’t respond to an interview request, but statements he made at his trial are indicative of the pressure Japan’s ivory dealers are under. “The thought of ivory no longer coming here is nerve-racking,” he said, and it was this “sense of impending crisis” that drove him to break the law.

It’s difficult to further judge the mood of ivory traders because they’re tight-lipped. “We don’t trust any journalists,” Shunji Koizumi, a representative from the Tokyo Ivory Arts and Crafts Association, a subsidiary of the Japan Federation of Ivory Arts and Crafts Associations, told my translator by phone. About a dozen other members likewise declined interview requests, and one manufacturer even indicated that he and his colleagues had been warned by the association and by someone at Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry not to speak with journalists. Keiko Aikawa, a deputy director at the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, denied knowledge of any such warning.

One member of the Japan Federation of Ivory Arts and Crafts Associations did agree to talk. Pipe tycoon Kyozaburo Tsuge no longer deals in ivory, but he was made an honorary member for the influence he wields and for his family’s prominent history in the industry. Tsuge’s personal ivory collection numbers more than a hundred sculptures in addition to countless netsuke, pipes, canes, tobacco holders, full tusks, and more. “With ivory, for me it’s not just about money,” he says. “What I’m really concerned about is the artistic, historical, and almost spiritual value of the work.”

Ivory manufacturers are “very worried and very nervous” about the direction the trade is going in Japan, Tsuge says. “People who are sticking to the legal side of the trade are feeling threatened because of the way they’re being treated.” As far as he and his friends are concerned, Japanese ivory traders aren’t the problem. “Everything is registered, everything is legal, everything is trackable in Japanese businesses,” Tsuge says. “But because there are so many other countries that don’t follow the rules, Japan is under suspicion and is suffering from the same restrictions and tightening of regulations.”

By “other countries,” Tsuge really means one country.

“It’s definitely just the Chinese,” he says, adding that for Japanese traders, “there’s a danger of being pulled into smuggling business with Chinese people or getting caught along with them.”

This is more than speculation. When EIA hired two investigators to pose as Chinese buyers intent on taking ivory out of Japan, all four wholesalers they approached were ready to do business. All, in fact, reassured their potential buyers that they’d made deals with Chinese in the past. “We sold so many ivory tusks [to the Chinese] that ivory has been vanishing from Japan,” one dealer bragged. Working with Chinese had caused the price for ivory to “surge,” another added.

According to an unpublished analysis of China’s reported ivory seizure data undertaken by the Elephant Trade Information System, a tool CITES uses to track trends in the illegal ivory trade, from 2011 to 2016 Japan ranked fourth—behind Nigeria, Tanzania, and Vietnam—in terms of top source countries for ivory coming into China. During that period, Traffic Japan tallied more than a hundred seizures of illegal ivory totaling 2.15 tons. “This could be the tip of the iceberg in terms of the volume of ivory coming from Japan to China,” says Tomomi Kitade, who heads the office.

View Images

A teacher of English in Nagano Prefecture, who asked not to be identified because a friend later told her it would be "bad" to show the world that she owns ivory, bought ivory hankos for her children after a traveling salesman told her they’d bring good luck. She spent $4,500 on the hankos and a couple of other good luck charms but says it was money well spent. “I believe a hanko can decide a person’s fate, so I wanted the best for my daughter and son."

While shipping ivory overseas is illegal, selling it in Japan to foreign buyers is not. Last November, the Tokyo police arrested a Chinese sailor trying to board a China-bound vessel with 605 ivory hankos. The investigation led the police to another Chinese national and to Masao Tsuchiya, director of the All Japan Ivory Center in Tokyo, both of whom were arrested earlier this year. Tsuchiya argued that he had no idea his Chinese customers intended to take the ivory he sold them out of the country. The prosecutor dismissed the case.

Despite the newly imposed ivory ban in China, demand there remains strong. Traffic’s China office has found that illegal sales continue online and that tourists are still buying ivory abroad to smuggle home.

“If neighboring countries with weak law enforcement—including Japan—don’t close their legal and illegal ivory markets, we will not be able to curb the illegal trade flowing into China,” says Zhou Fei, the head of Traffic’s China office. Of Japan’s record 24 million visitors in 2016, the majority came from East Asia, and Chinese interest in visiting Japan increased 130 percent from 2015 to 2016, according to a Trip Advisor analysis.

For now, Japan has not answered that call. In an EIA report scheduled to be published on October 8, investigators found that nearly 60 percent of more than 300 hanko vendors they approached had no qualms about customers taking ivory out of Japan. Several even offered to mail the ivory abroad themselves, which is illegal.

It’s impossible to ascertain how much ivory remains in Japan, but officials insist that the industry will naturally close once those reserves run out. On the contrary, conservationists warn that as the stash is depleted, the temptation to smuggle in tusks from newly poached elephants could become irresistible.

This may already be happening. In 2015 Huang Qun, former director of the Judiciary Identification Center of the National Forest Police Bureau, in Beijing, examined a seizure of more than 1,300 pounds of tusks from Japan that appeared to have come from recently killed elephants. The enamel was moist, and the tusks were free from cracks and mildew, while their outer surface had deep deposits of grime. The tusks could have originated from the 2008 legal sale, but generally, Huang says, “these characteristics pertain to recent tusks, not more than five years old.”

Despite signs of cracks in Japan’s ivory controls, the official position remains the same: Japan is not considering closing its ivory market. “There’s no way we should be denying the rights of people who legally own ivory to engage in legal transactions of that ivory,” says the Ministry of the Environment’s Reiji Kamezawa.

“Keeping the ivory trade alive,” Tsuge adds, “is something that the government and the ivory association agree on.”

In June—in an effort to dispel mounting criticism, and citing a desire to strengthen controls—Japan tweaked its regulatory laws for ivory trade. Rather than regulate ivory products directly, though, officials have chosen to increase their supervisory power over traders. The country’s 300 manufacturers and 8,200 retailers must now register their businesses every five years, making it possible, for the first time, for the government to reject an application to trade in ivory. Traders also must register all the whole tusks in their possession, and as in the past, they must self-report all their sales on a paper ledger. Maximum fines have been increased from $9,000 for an individual or business to $905,000 for a business or $45,000 for an individual. Meanwhile the Ministry of Environment hired four new field officers tasked with controlling trade in endangered species.

JTEF’s Masayuki Sakamoto calls these measure window dressing. “I know the practices of this administration, so I don’t believe they will conduct a serious supervision over the dealers,” he says. “The purpose of this ‘supervision’ is to protect the industry.”

EIA’s Allan Thornton says that “there’s absolutely nothing in the new law that makes a molecule of difference.”

Japanese officials disagree. As Horimaki at the Ministry of the Environment says, “We believe the amended law will do the job.”

“WE DON’T HAVE TO USE IVORY”

Some Japanese ivory users have come to see a domestic trade ban as inevitable—even welcome. “We aren’t ivory artists; we’re netsuke artists,” says Akira Kuroiwa, chairman of the International Netsuke Carvers’ Association. “We don’t have to use ivory.”

Very few Japanese today create large-scale ivory sculptures of the sort produced in the Meiji period, but netsuke craftsmanship has made something of a comeback among a small group of artists and collecting enthusiasts, including Princess Hisako of Takamado. Most artists now use a variety of materials, including wood, deer antler, metal, water buffalo horn, plastic, and stone—but for many, ivory still reigns supreme, according to Atsushi Date, chief curator of the Kyoto Seishu Netsuke Art Museum.

“The material itself is beautiful, the color is warm, and it has enduring hardness,” says Kukan Oikawa, an award-winning netsuke artist in Tokyo. Yet Oikawa has no interest in using ivory if there’s a chance it contributes to illegal trade. “That would betray my customers and my art,” he says.

Pull Quote
We don’t trust any journalists.
Shunji Koizumi, Tokyo Ivory Arts and Crafts Association

Like Kuroiwa and others, Oikawa suspects that ivory’s time is running out, and he’s preparing accordingly. In his studio, he hands me a small wooden box. Nestled inside is a tiny, strikingly lifelike white rabbit with shining red eyes. It looks indistinguishable from ivory, but it’s elforyn—a type of plastic—and one of several materials Oikawa is exploring as a substitute for ivory. “I want to find a material that looks like ivory but isn’t ivory, to keep this technique of carving alive,” he says.

Some hanko manufacturers agree with this thinking. A few have already opted out of selling ivory hankos, while others, including Soke Nihon Insou Kyokai, the company that first kicked off the ivory hanko craze, are considering alternatives. “Since we can’t really deny that Japan is part of the illegal market, I think we have to follow the way the world is going,” says Takumi Isono, head of the sales promotion department.

Yahoo! Japan, the world’s largest online platform for ivory, hasn’t budged on the issue (a company spokesperson cited the need to “stay respectful of Japanese culture”), but other major retailers are leading the way. Rakuten, the e-commerce company that Sakamoto previously investigated, banned ivory in 2017, and Aeon, a prominent retail group, has already phased ivory out of its shops and given its mall tenants until 2020 to do the same.

“We’re just following our own standards for biodiversity conservation and sustainability,” says Haruko Kanamaru, head of Aeon’s corporate citizenship department. “We’re going along with the international community in moving forward with this.”

Some officials agree with this sentiment, though they generally keep such thoughts to themselves. “If everyone in the larger international community is moving forward, what’s the use of us staying back here, calling for an ivory market?” says Hideka Morimoto, a vice minister at the Ministry of the Environment. “I’m upset that this tiny group of people who are profiting from illegal ivory trade are overshadowing all the things Japan is actually doing to protect wildlife, and ruining our reputation.”

Sakamoto believes external pressure is the best hope for changing Japan’s policies. Before stepping down as the U.K.’s foreign secretary in July, Boris Johnson urged Taro Kono, Japan’s foreign minister, to enact an ivory ban, and U.S. officials have also been engaged.

“We’ve encouraged Japan, as we have with other countries, to reduce illegal ivory trade by closing its ivory market,” says Judy Garber, principal deputy assistant secretary at the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. “Maintaining a domestic ivory market can contribute to masking illegal trade and complicate all our joint efforts to wipe out wildlife trafficking.”

Whether Japan heeds this message or remains one of the world’s last ivory trade havens remains to be seen. But in the meantime, thousands of elephants continue to be poached for their tusks each year. As Masayuki Sakamoto says, “It’s crucial for the international community not to let Japan slip now, because elephants won’t be given another chance.”

Rachel Nuwer is a freelance journalist. Her book, Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking, is available now.

Brent Stirton is a senior staff photographer for Reportage by Getty Images. He is a regular contributor to National Geographic.

This investigation was assisted by a grant from the Abe Fellowship Program, administered by the Social Science Research Council and in cooperation with, and with funds provided by, the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership.
Wildlife Watch is an investigative reporting project between National Geographic Society and National Geographic Partners focusing on wildlife crime and exploitation. Read more Wildlife Watch stories here, and learn more about National Geographic Society’s nonprofit mission at nationalgeographic.org . Send tips, feedback, and story ideas to ngwildlife@natgeo.com.

象牙の違法取引を日本が助長か

View Images

日本の伝統的な弦楽器である三味線の名人は、象牙の駒とばちを使って上質な音を出す。「専門家にしか聞き分けられない微妙な違いです」と東京浅草組合、浅草見番の更代姐さんは話す。日本では1970年以降、少なくとも26万頭分の象牙が消費されている。

中国の取引全面禁止で、抜け穴だらけの日本が違法象牙の温床に

この夏、東京を訪れた多くの観光客と同様、私たちも浅草を目指した。だが私たちが見たかったのは、浅草寺でもなければあの有名な芸者の踊りでもない。世界のほぼ全ての国で禁止されているというのに、日本では合法的に堂々と売られている象牙を探すことだ。

そこにたどり着くのに、それほど時間はかからなかった。自撮り写真を撮る人々、腹の底に響く太鼓の音、焼き立てのたこ焼きのにおいに後ろ髪をひかれつつ、ある一軒の店に入って道を尋ねた。この辺りに、中国風の象牙アクセサリーを売る店があると聞いたんだが。店の主人は首を振って言った。おそらく、その店はもうないんじゃないか。

「でも、象牙を探してるんだったら、いいのがあるよ」

その店はサンゴの専門店だったが、主人はカウンターの後ろの引き出しを開け、中からネックレスを取り出した。マッチ箱大の見事な細工の観音菩薩が、チェーンにぶら下がっていた。美しく波打つ衣装をまとい、とぐろを巻いた竜と不死鳥の羽がそれを取り巻いている。

「象牙」。クリーム色の彫刻を指さして、店の主人は言った。たったの5万円だという。破格値だ。

それは、この上もなく美しかった。私はネックレスを一緒にいた友人の首にかけ、写真を撮った。それから店の主人に、象牙を日本国外へ持ち出すことは違法じゃないのかと尋ねた。ニューヨークへ持ち帰ったら、厄介なことにならないだろうか。

しばらくの間を置いて、主人は答えた。「そりゃあ、税関に見せちゃいかんよ。でも、ニューヨークから来て象牙をアメリカへ持ち帰ったお客はたくさんいるよ」

そして私のバッグを指さし、中に何かを隠すしぐさをして見せた。「それとも、シャツの中に入れて持って行ったらいいさ」。自分の服の襟をたたいて、そう言った。「たぶん大丈夫」

難色を示す私たちの手に、主人は構わず名刺を握らせた。「明日の朝は9時から開いてるよ!」

国際的な象牙取引は1990年から違法とされているが、冒頭のようなやり取りは依然としてなくならないことから、米国、英国、フランス、台湾など世界中の国と地域で、国内の象牙取引もほぼ全面的に禁止する方向に流れは進んでいる。英国のマイケル・ゴーブ環境食糧農村地域大臣は、2019年に同国で施行される禁止法が「アフリカで壊滅的なまでに減少したゾウの個体数回復に貢献できる最も効果的な措置のひとつとなる」と発言した。

どんなに規制を厳しくしても、象牙の合法的な取引がなくならない限り、それは違法取引の隠れみのとされてしまう危険をはらむ。世界有数の象牙需要がある中国は、アフリカでのゾウ密猟をあおる最大の要因となってきたが、2018年1月に国内市場を閉鎖し、高く評価された。

ところが、その結果今度は日本が突如世界最大の合法象牙市場という不名誉な地位を受け継いでしまった。保護活動家は、そんな日本を「象牙禁止からの最後の避難所」と呼ぶ。これまでは違法取引とは縁がないものとして長年見過ごされてきたが、だからと言って悪用されないとは限らない。それを示す証拠も出てきている。

View Images

ケニア当局は2011年、シンガポールで押収され返還された5トンの象牙を焼却処分した。日本での主な象牙製品である名前の入っていないはんこも多数含まれていた。

「世界では、日本人は一般的に法を守る人たちという印象があるようですが、実際はそうでもありません」。東京に拠点を置く認定NPO法人トラ・ゾウ保護基金(JTEF)事務局長理事で環境弁護士の坂元雅行氏は言う。

JTEFが他の数団体と協力して実施した調査では、日本の規制が抜け穴だらけで、悪用しようと思えば簡単にできる実態が明らかになった。象牙の不正登録、国外発送、そして私自身が経験したように、海外へ持ち出すとわかっている客へ販売するなど。野生生物取引を監視する団体「トラフィック」によると、2011年から2016年にかけて、日本から国外へ持ち出そうとして没収された象牙の量は2.4トン、そのほぼ全てが中国向けだった。

この結果を受けて、日本も他国と同様に国内の象牙市場を閉鎖すべきというプレッシャーが強まっている。サンフランシスコの非営利団体「ワイルドエイド」代表ピーター・ナイト氏は言う。「人間はローマ帝国時代からゾウを殺してきましたが、象牙取引を今すぐやめることは可能です。それができれば、人類は素晴らしい偉業を達成できるでしょう。そして、日本はその先鋒になることだってできるのです」

ところが日本政府は、日本の象牙市場が持続可能な取引を遵守し、厳しく規制しているため、全面禁止の必要はないという数十年来の立ち場を変えていない。環境省野生生物課長の堀上勝氏は、「日本は密猟の責任を問われているわけではありません。ですから、現時点で政府としては象牙市場の閉鎖を検討しておりません」と話す。「絶滅のおそれのある野生動植物の種の国際取引に関する条約(CITES、通称ワシントン条約)」が、密猟や違法取引を助長する国内象牙市場のある国は全てそれを閉鎖すべきであると提案しているが、日本政府は受け入れていない。

日本で現在合法とされている象牙取引が、ゾウの将来にどう影響するかを予測するのは極めて困難であると、ワシントンDCにあるブルッキングス研究所の上席研究員バンダ・フェルバブ・ブラウン氏は言う。「日本から中国へ持ち出された象牙で、既存の需要を満たせるのか、それともそれがもっと需要をあおり立てて、アフリカでゾウの密猟を増加させるのかは、非常に複雑な問題です。分かっていることは、日本の規制は象牙の違法輸出を防ぐには十分ではないということです」

アフリカにおける密猟はとどまるところを知らず、一部の専門家は、日本での規制が不十分なために、次の象牙ロンダリングの最終目的地になるのではないかと危惧している。

View Images

ケニアのツァボ・イースト国立公園に暮らすアフリカゾウ。アフリカゾウは重さ45キロにもなる巨大な牙を持つが、乱獲によって個体数が減少している。

日本の象牙の歴史

Pull Quote
ゾウの大量殺戮を再び招いたという点で、日本には重大な倫理的責任があります
アラン・ソーントン, 環境調査エージェンシー(EIA)

はるか昔から、ゾウは象牙を目的とした狩猟の対象となってきた。過去100年間で、アフリカのゾウは1000万頭から40万~50万頭にまで減少したと推定されている。サバンナでは2007~2014年の間に30%もゾウの数が減り、密猟のために毎年数千頭が殺されている。

現在の危機をもたらした原因は、主に中国での高い需要にあるが、日本もこれに一役買っている。ワシントンDCにある環境調査エージェンシー(EIA)代表のアラン・ソーントン氏によると、日本は1970年以降少なくとも26万2500頭分の象牙を消費してきた。そのほとんどが、大型の成体のものだ。日本の象牙熱は、1970年代と1980年代に壊滅的な密猟をあおり、アフリカゾウの個体数はこの期間に50%も減少した。

1990年に象牙の国際取引が禁止されて以来、日本は国際市場再開に向けて働きかけてきた。1999年と2008年には、国内の在庫を補充するため、一時的に象牙を輸入する権利を獲得した(カリフォルニア大学バークレー校とプリンストン大学の研究者らの報告書によると、2度目には中国も参加し、それが最近のゾウの密猟と象牙密輸の急増につながったと考えるのが最も妥当であるいう)。

「1989年の禁止措置撤廃運動をリードし、ゾウの大量殺戮を再び招いたという点で、日本には重大な倫理的責任があります。CITESの承認を得て2度にわたり象牙輸入を行い、禁止措置を撤回したことは最大の過ちであり、大々的な密猟が再燃するきっかけを作ってしまいました」

現在、日本の象牙産業は「地球上で最大」であると、ソーントン氏は指摘する。中国国内には、取引禁止前に170カ所の象牙販売店があったが、日本には8200店舗、300の製造業者、500の卸業者が存在する。

東京象牙美術工芸協同組合のウェブサイトには、「日本の文化にとって不可欠の伝統産業」と書かれているが、実際には象牙が日本へ入ってきたのは比較的最近のことで、利用法も時代が変わるにつれて変化してきた。

View Images

京都清宗根付館が所蔵する現代根付のコレクション。衰退していく伝統工芸への関心を取り戻すため、年に1度の根付コンテストや定期的な交流会を開催している。

「日本には、中国ほど洗練された伝統的象牙彫刻はありません」と語るのは、共同通信社のジャーナリストで作家の井田徹治氏だ。1992年から象牙の取材をしてきた井田氏は言う。「象牙は文化遺産であるという主張は間違いです」

象牙が日本へ入ってきたのは、西暦1500年代のことだ。当時は、大名や貴族階級が使う高級家具の装飾や、三味線のばち、茶道具などに使われた。江戸時代に入って象牙の人気は急速に拡大し、1600年代から1800年代半ばまで、新たに台頭した商人階級が、象牙の髪飾りやたばこ入れ、根付(ねつけ)を求めるようになった。

根付とは、ポケットのない着物を着る際に、小さな袋などをひもで結んで帯から下げて持ち歩くための留め具で、穴にひもを通し、その先に袋を結び付ける。着物文化が洗練されるにつれて、おしゃれに気を遣う人は季節や行事に合わせて根付を選ぶようになった。そして根付の素材で最も人気があったのが、象牙である。

「江戸時代後期になると、庶民でも1人1個は象牙細工を所有するようになっていたと思います。人々は贅沢品として、象牙を大切にしていました」。京都にある清水三年坂美術館の朝山衣恵氏は言う。

1853年の黒船来航から明治維新にかけて、日本の工芸品を愛する外国からの訪問者のおかげで、象牙の需要は急増した。新たに象牙細工産業が生まれ、エレガントな女性、素朴な農夫、笑顔の子どもたちの姿を彫った象牙細工が大量に生産された。「需要が大きくなると、作品も大きくなりました。西洋の商人たちは象牙の彫刻品を買うために日本を訪れ、日本の美術商は国外にも支店を持つようになります」と、朝山氏。

一方、日本人の間では西洋のファッションがもてはやされるようになり、象牙は新鮮味を失っていった。逆に、外国人が根付や仏像、骨董品などの象牙製品を好んで買い求め、新しい製品は輸出用に限定して製造されるようになった。第二次世界大戦でその輸出も止まったが、戦後間もなく象牙は新たな活路を見いだす。次なるターゲットは、たばこだった。

新しい象牙製品

パイプ職人の柘恭一郎氏は、戦争から戻ってくると新たなビジネスチャンスをものにした。当時、日本ではかなり多くの人が喫煙していたが、米国の供給する紙巻たばこにはフィルターがなく、最後まで吸うことが困難だった。そこで柘氏は、象牙で作ったシガレットホルダーに目を付けた。火をつけても燃えないし、象牙とはすなわちゾウの歯なので、口にくわえたときの歯あたりがいい。柘氏のシガレットホルダーはすぐに人気を呼んだ。

1950年代には事業を拡大して、120人の職人を雇い、東京に駐留する数千人の米国人を対象に土産用の象牙パイプを作り始めた。富士山や舞妓、竜といった日本らしいモチーフを彫り込んだパイプが特に人気で、3000~5000円程度で売られた。当時の日本人の給料1カ月分に相当する。息子の恭三郎氏は、日本人の立ち入りが禁じられていた銀座の米国人向け娯楽施設へ、毎週のように商品を届けた。

進駐軍の撤退に伴ってパイプの需要は干上がり、シガレットホルダーの代わりに紙フィルターが主流になった。だが、この時もまた象牙は姿を変えて盛り返しを図る。それが、今に至るまで日本の象牙消費をけん引し続けている。

山梨県出身の行商人だった坂本光氏は、裕福な家庭に宝石を売り歩いていた。あるとき、客が高価な商品を購入する際に安物の木製印鑑を使っていることに気づいた。日本人であれば、誰でも印鑑は必要だ。これは宝石よりも儲かるのではないかと、坂本氏は考えた。

1967年、坂本氏は象牙印鑑を専門とする宗家日本印相協会を創立した。象牙で印鑑を作ったのは坂本氏が初めてではないが、その斬新なマーケティング戦略で成功を収める。高級印鑑を所有していると幸運を招くという迷信に目を付けたのである。ゾウは家族の絆が強く、長寿であるため、象牙の印鑑を所有すれば、長寿、幸運、調和に恵まれると宣伝した。西洋で、「ダイヤモンドは永遠の輝き」というキャッチフレーズで婚約指輪が飛ぶように売れたのと同様、坂本氏の象牙広告も日本で絶大な効果を上げた。

井田氏は指摘する。「クジラの肉を食すのと同じで、象牙印鑑の迷信も業界と広告会社が作り上げたものです。日本の文化でもなければ伝統でもありません。持続的利用の原則とも全く関係ありません」(井田氏の言う「持続的利用」とは、動物の個体数を損なわない限りにおいて動物やその体の部分を取引すること)

事実、印鑑産業の急成長はアフリカゾウの犠牲の上に成り立っていた。この頃までに、象牙目的で大量のゾウが殺されていた。1982年、日本は香港を抜いて世界一の象牙消費国となり、わずか10年で12万頭のゾウに相当する2700トン以上の象牙を輸入した。当時の日本の象牙は70%が密猟されたゾウから取られた違法象牙であると推定され、そのうち少なくとも半分から、年間200万本以上の印鑑が製造された。

「1980年代、日本は象牙の消費量という点だけでなく、違法取引という点でも重大な役割を果たしていました」と語るのは、学習院大学の国際政治および地球環境ガバナンス教授の阪口功氏だ。「アフリカゾウが生息するほぼ全ての国において、ゾウを絶滅寸前に追いやった責任が日本にはあります」

View Images

やりで命を奪われたケニアの雄ゾウ。象牙の違法取引を阻止するため、レンジャーたちが象牙を切り落とした。

密猟危機といっても、多くの象牙印鑑の製造者や所有者にはピンとこない。アフリカとそれが抱える問題は、日本から遠く離れた世界の果てにある。阪口氏によれば、密猟された象牙はアフリカや香港の輸出業者が作成した不正許可証を貼られ、あらゆるルートを通って、日本へ到着する頃には合法象牙に姿を変えているのだ。

望月貢商店は、はんこの里として有名な山梨県六郷にある印鑑の大手卸業者だ。その代表を務める望月孝氏は、フランスのテレビ局が取材に来た30年前の日のことを思い出すと、今でも身震いすると話す。「放送が始まると、最初は近所のはんこ店が紹介されていたのですが、突然ゾウの死体が画面に映し出されたんです。とても受け入れられるようなものじゃなかったです」

それ以来、取材陣が次々に押し掛けてきた。どの取材も、「日本は密猟者に殺されたゾウの象牙が最後に行き着く場所として描くのが狙い」だったという。だが、望月氏や六郷の人々にとって、ゾウは「貴い、聖なる存在です。私たちは以前から、殺すのではなく、どこかで自然死したゾウの象牙だけを使ってきました。ゾウ殺しのビジネスには一切関わっていません」。望月氏とその同業者たちは、今もその立場を貫いている。

密猟危機の報道が最高潮に達した1980年代後半、日本政府はついに重い腰を上げた。象牙の国際取引が禁止される4カ月前の1989年6月、日本も一時的に象牙の輸入を停止したのだ。業界関係者は、その年のCITES会議で、アフリカゾウの保護拡大に反対するよう日本政府に求めたが、投票を棄権することだけが政府にできる精一杯のことだったという。

Pull Quote
過去の歴史を見れば、ゾウを絶滅に追いやることのない程度に取引を管理しようとしても無理なのは明らかです。
坂元雅, トラ・ゾウ保護基金(JTEF)

1985年から1990年までCITES事務局を務め、象牙やその他の野生生物問題で日本政府にアドバイスする金子与止男氏は言う。「あの年のCITES会議で象牙取引の全面禁止が支持されたのを機に、アフリカゾウの悲劇が始まってしまいました。それまで象牙を持続的に利用することでゾウの保護に成功してきたアフリカ南部の国々は、取引禁止によって収入源を失い、不当な扱いを受けてしまったんです」

金子氏は、全面禁止ではなく、健全なゾウの個体数を保っている国には取引継続を認め、そこから得られた利益をゾウの保護に使えるようにすべきだったと主張する。「長期的なゾウの管理政策に投資できるはずの定収入を、彼らは失ってしまいました。せっかく保護に成功した国々が他国のとばっちりを受けるのは残念です」

環境省の堀上勝氏によると、野生生物の持続可能な取引に関する「CITESの精神に従うからこそ」象牙の取引を支持するのだという。東京女子大学の保全生態学者である石井信夫氏も、合法的に象牙を販売できれば、アフリカ南部の地域社会は積極的にゾウを保護しようという気になると指摘する。石井氏は、1989年からCITESの日本代表を務めている。「日本が市場を閉鎖してしまったら、アフリカの国を支援することもできなくなってしまいます」

JTEFの坂元雅行氏は、30年間同じような話を何度も聞いてきたが、象牙の合法取引がゾウを救うという考えには賛同できない。「石井氏や他の取引支持者は、『ゾウの生息する国には支援が必要だ』とか『動物がその価値を失えば、保護の意欲もなくなる』といった抽象的な原則を繰り返すだけです。理論上は確かに、野生生物の持続可能な利用法には色々なやり方があるでしょう。けれども象牙に関していえば、現実にはそぐわないのです。過去の歴史を見れば、ゾウを絶滅に追いやることのない程度に取引を管理しようとしても無理なのは明らかです」

井田氏も同意して言う。「日本には違法な象牙市場などないと断言できる人はいません」。それでも、象牙を含む野生生物由来の製品を持続可能な限りにおいて利用するという「日本政府の基本的立場」は変わらない。

終わらない戦い

1990年に象牙の国際取引禁止が決まり、坂元氏が喜んだのは束の間だった。日本における象牙問題の中心的存在である彼は、このとき以降、国際取引の再開を目指して政府に陳情を行う象牙業者たちを注視してきた。

View Images

トラ・ゾウ保護基金(JTEF)の事務局長理事を務める坂元雅行氏。1990年代前半から日本での象牙取引を調査している。象牙市場の閉鎖を日本政府に求め続ける一人だ。

そうした最大勢力の一つが、日本象牙美術工芸組合連合会だ。象牙製品メーカーの団体で、家族経営の会社が多く、1800年代後半までルーツをたどれる社もある。このころ、アフリカとインドから象牙を調達するという、ややこしい物流を円滑に進められるよう、連合会が活動を始めた。現在、連合会の50人ほどのメンバーが日本での合法取引と商品製造の大部分を支配しており、坂元氏いわく、政府と密接な関係を築いている。

日本の貿易管理の甘さについて坂元氏は独自の調査を行ったものの、国際的な政治力にはかなわなかった。1997年にジンバブエのハラレで開催されたCITES会議の際、日本の当局者と産業界の代表者たちが強く接近していた同国のロバート・ムガベ大統領は、他の政府出席者に対し、日本への象牙輸出を支持するようプレッシャーをかけた。提案が通過するのを、坂元氏は敗北感と共に見つめた。ジンバブエの出席者たちが国歌を威勢よく歌い始め、日本人は拳を握って椅子から跳び上がっていた。

「私の努力が足りなかったことを申し訳なく思いました」と坂元氏は語る。「日本が象牙の国際取引禁止を弱体化させるのを、私たちは止められなかったのです」

会議の後、坂元氏はボツワナのチョベ国立公園を訪れ、野生のアフリカゾウを初めて見た。この体験は、今も彼の中で強い感情を呼び起こす。オープンカーで公園内を走っている時、ゾウの一家を率いるメスが突進してきた。車がゾウの群れを横切ったのを脅威と感じたのだ。

「本当に地面が揺れました」と坂元氏は振り返る。「殺されると思いました。もしそうだとしたら、運命だとも。ゾウのために十分な働きができなかったのですから」。運転手はぎりぎりで逆方向に転換した。氏は震えながらも、静かに誓いを立てた。「心の中でゾウたちに言いました。彼らのために闘い続けると」

闘いは大変な挑戦となった。1997年にCITESがまず象牙50トンを日本に輸出することを認めると、その直後から、日本の当局者たちは再び同じ輸出措置を求めてロビー活動を開始した。しかもこの時、日本は孤立無援ではなかった。以前は自国の象牙産業の衰退を諦観していた中国が、取引再開の権利を求め始めた。

「日本と中国は常に摩擦が多く、競争関係にありました」と語るのは、国際動物福祉基金(IFAW)のアジア地域局長、グレース・ゲ・ガブリエル氏だ。米マサチューセッツ州に拠点を置く非営利団体のIFAWは、動物福祉と保護に取り組んでいる。「象牙を日本に与え続け、中国を無視し続けるなら……いち中国人として、日本を中国より優遇するのは不公平だとも感じました」

一方ガブリエル氏は、2度目の輸入を認めれば「ゾウにとっての災い」になるであろうことも分かっていた。彼女の研究で分かっていたのは、中国市場は著しく準備不足であり、日本の象牙規制はそれよりもさらに悪いということだ。だが、そうした懸念はまたも退けられた。アフリカゾウの生息地を抱える20カ国からの抗議にもかかわらず、2度目の象牙取引が2008年に行われ、中国に62トン、日本に39トンの象牙が渡った。密猟の危機がたちまち起こり、以来、中国は象牙に関わるニュースの見出しを独占してきた。

しかし、ガブリエル氏や坂元氏らは、違法取引の可能性という点で日本が眠れる巨人であることを危惧している。中国が市場を閉ざした今、巨人が再び目覚めるかもしれない。「違法な象牙業者は間違いなく、新しい合法市場を隠れみのにしようと試みるでしょう」と坂元氏は言う。「日本はそれに備えなければなりません」

1990年の国際取引禁止の後、西洋で象牙が死と強欲さのシンボルとして非難の対象になったのと違い、日本での象牙のイメージは傷つきはしても壊れることはなかった。阪口氏は規制の抜け穴や違法取引に触れ、「日本の消費者の大半は、国内の象牙問題を意識していません」と話す。「日本人の認識のレベルはまだ非常に低いです」

Number and value of ivory transactions each year in Yahoo! Japan auctions

28,407

$6,225,508

$3,820,709

16,368

3,846

Transactions

$588,720

‘13

‘15

‘09

‘11

‘07

‘17

2005

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND; OANDA

28,407

$6,225,508

Number and value of ivory transactions each year in Yahoo! Japan auctions

$3,820,709

16,368

3,846

Transactions

$588,720

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND; OANDA

中国では、象牙は富と名声を象徴する。東京とケニアのナイロビに拠点を置く非営利団体「アフリカゾウの涙」の共同創立者、山脇愛理氏によれば、日本では「ステータスの誇示ではなく、日常的に使うことが目的」だという。

日本人の象牙への関心は今も続いているが、現在、取引の多くがインターネットでなされていることから、実態は今まで以上に見えにくくなっている。JTEFの分析によると、Yahoo! JAPANのオークションで象牙製品が落札された件数は、2005 年の4000件未満から2015年の2万8000件超へと、着実に伸びている。2017年は1万6000件に減少したが、依然として多い(この減少は、メディアが象牙問題に厳しい目を向けたことと、Yahoo! JAPANが監視を増やした結果とみられる。Yahoo! JAPANは、米ヤフー社の統制は受けていない)。2015年、Yahoo! JAPANに加え、人気のEコマースサイトである楽天をJTEFとEIAが1日に限って調査したところ、象牙の広告が合計約1万2200件も見つかった。

日本では今も象牙の茶道具、楽器の部品、仏教で祈りに使う数珠、宝飾品などが生産されているが、根強い関心を支えているのは、はんこの広告キャンペーンだ。象牙印鑑を約70万本保有しているはんこ産業は、現在の象牙消費量の推定80%を占める。1980年代以降、日常生活で印鑑を使うことは減っているが、家を買う、結婚する、遺産を相続するといった人生の大きな出来事には今も印鑑が必要だ。象牙は多くの人にとって、業界が盛んに宣伝している通り、印材の「最高の権威」そして「王様」であり続けている。

「巨大な抜け穴」

View Images

「Yahoo! JAPAN」のショッピングサイトで象牙の違法販売をチェックする坂元雅行氏。Yahoo! JAPANと米国の「Yahoo!」は無関係だ。日本の法律では、象牙の登録と登録証の提示が義務づけられているが、写真の商品は登録証を添付していない。日本の有名ショッピングサイトやeコマース企業は軒並み、象牙の販売を禁止しているが、同様の措置を講じる予定はないとYahoo! JAPANは述べている。

日本の当局は、日本で販売されている象牙製品は骨董品か、1990年の国際取引禁止以前、もしくはその後に2度輸入された象牙から合法的に作られたものであり、日本の市場が唐突に非難にさらされるのは不公平であると考えている。そして、日本の象牙規制は他国の規制より優れてはいないにしても、同等であると考えているのだ。

「日本の貿易政策は他の国々と同じです」と、経済産業省野生動植物貿易審査室長の中野潤也氏は話す。「我々は象牙の国際取引を禁止し、国内取引もごく少数の例外的なケースしか認めていません。(国際取引禁止が決まった)CITES会議より前と、その後2回だけの輸入されたときの象牙です」

外務省地球環境課の滑川博愛氏によれば、日本の問題は象牙の規制ではなくコミュニケーションだという。「日本が他国ほど広報活動に長けていないのは問題かもしれません」と滑川氏は話した。「しかし規制の点では、日本はとても厳格なのです。米国や英国とほとんど同じです」

だが他の国々は、ほぼすべての象牙取引を禁止しているか、禁止を決める途上にある。研究者で著述家のフェルバブ=ブラウン氏は、「日本の象牙販売の規模は、米国や英国と比べると桁が違います」と指摘する。加えてEIAのアラン・ソーントン氏は、日本の当局者が象牙取引規制を米英と同等としていることを「不合理で根拠のない主張」と話す。

一例を挙げると、日本国内で象牙を取引するには登録が必要だが、実際に登録しなければならないのは全形の象牙だけだ。象牙のはんこ、彫刻、小物は規制されていない。切り分けた象牙(カットピース)も同様だ。過去に日本へ向かう途中で押収された違法象牙の貨物に、2つから3つに分割された象牙が多かったのはこのためだと、ソーントン氏は言う。そのようなカットピースがいったん日本に入れば、販売を防ぐ規制は一切ない。

View Images

象牙製品を買わないでと呼びかけるポスター。東京で開催されたアースデイのイベントで撮影。NPO「アフリカゾウの涙」の共同創立者である山脇愛理氏によれば、殺されたゾウの写真、野生動物を守ろうとして命を奪われたレンジャーの統計データを見せるより、もっと気楽にメッセージを伝えた方が日本人には効果的だという。「『臭い物に蓋をする』ということわざがありますが、象牙に対する日本の反応をよく表しています」

日本の国際郵便制度も密輸業者に有利に働いている。申告価格が2000ドル未満の輸入品は通常の規制から免除されるためだ。こうした貨物から見つかった象牙は押収されず、引き取り手が現れなければ送り主に返される。日本の税関によると、ここ数年で象牙数百点(中国からの彫刻、ナイジェリアとジンバブエからのカットピース、フランスからの牙など)を返送している。

こうした「巨大な抜け穴」のために、と井田徹治氏は言う。「アフリカ諸国からの違法象牙は一切使用していないと、日本は100%自信を持って言うことはできません」

Number of tusks registered each year with the Japan Wildlife Research Center

3,664

A dramatic increase in the number of tusks registered in 2009 followed the approval in 2008 by CITES of a sale of 39 tons of ivory to Japan.

1,687

Tusks

252

‘15

‘16

2005

‘07

‘09

‘11

‘13

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT, JAPAN; JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND

3,664

Number of tusks registered each year with the

Japan Wildlife Research Center

A dramatic increase in the number of tusks registered in 2009 followed the approval in 2008 by CITES of a sale of 39 tons of ivory to Japan.

1,687

252

Tusks

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO, NGM STAFF.

SOURCES: MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT, JAPAN; JAPAN TIGER AND ELEPHANT FUND

全形の象牙の場合、密輸でなければ日本に入れない。不正な取引業者が国内の法規制から逃れ、象牙を合法にするには、象牙を半分に切りさえすればいい。しかし坂元氏によれば、実際にはその必要性すらない。日本で商業販売のために象牙を合法扱いにすることは、原産地にかかわらず容易だからだ。所有者は領収書や炭素年代分析で牙の年代を証明する必要はなく、実物を検査のために持ち込む必要もない。申請書に記入し、写真を何枚か撮り、友人(または家族でもいい)に「1990年より前に登録者の家でこの象牙を見た」という事実を証明する文書を書いてもらう。このシステムは「公式のロンダリング」と変わらないと坂元氏は言う。

日本で登録された全形の象牙の数は、2006年のわずか408本から2016年の1687本まで着々と増えている。これを危惧した坂元氏と戸川久美氏は、違法な象牙のロンダリングをやってのけることがいかに簡単かを明らかにしようとした。2015年、2人がEIAと協力して雇った調査員が、象牙登録を監督する非政府機関である自然環境研究センターに電話し、「父から相続した象牙を登録したい」と相談した。だが彼女は、父が象牙を取得したのは2000年ごろだと話した。つまり違法だ。仲介業者は彼女を止めるどころか、例えば1985年に父の家でこの象牙を見たことがあると言うように指示し、「何の疑いも、問題も生じない」ようにと、書類に書く内容もアドバイスした。業者は、彼女の申請書を提出前に見てあげようとさえ申し出た。

相続した象牙についての話は変えないまま、調査員は次に象牙の取引業者に電話した。彼らは登録済みの全形象牙を一般の人から買い、象牙製品の製造会社に売ることで利益を上げている。37の業者のうち30業者は、無登録の象牙を直接買い取るか、あるいは第三者の証言に関して書類に嘘を書き、象牙を不正に登録するのを手助けするなどの違法行為を提案してきた。日本有数の象牙会社のバイヤーが、こう言って彼女を安心させた。「私はこういうケースを500~600件扱ってきましたが、第三者の証言について疑われたことは全くありません。1件もです」

ソーントン氏は、法律を破ることをいとわない企業の多さに本当に驚かされた。「着手したときは、腐ったリンゴが3、4個見つかるくらいに思っていました」と氏は言う。しかし、象牙取引の推進派はこうした実態を意に介さない。「なぜ象牙規制が100%完璧でなければならないと主張するのか、理解できません」と、政府アドバイザーの金子氏は言う。

JTEFやEIAの調査について、政府が直接回答したことは1度もない。だが2017年初め、自然環境研究センターの象牙登録担当官が警告を発した。疑わしいほどよく似た申請を多く発見したのだ。申請者たちの間につながりはなさそうなのに、写真に写ったカーペットは同じに見え、証言が書かれたフォントが一致していて、象牙の取得に関する説明は、ほとんど見分けが付かないほど似通っていた。

警視庁の捜査で、2つの象牙取引業者「ラフテル」と「フローレス」が書類送検され、無登録の象牙27本を押収した。売り主に代わって2社が不正に登録しようとしていた物だった。だが2社の幹部は潔白を主張した。自分たちは自然環境研究センターから許可を得て、象牙の真正性を保証できるよう、登録前に象牙を預かっているという理由だった。JTEFの坂元氏、日本のメディア、警視庁によると、検察は説明を受け入れて不起訴とし、押収した牙を返還した。

この事件が日本のメディアで広く報じられたことは、一部当局者の怒りを買った。「この種の違法取引がメディアによって取り上げられ、日本の合法な象牙市場にこのような不透明な部分があるかのように報道されたことは、実に残念であり、憤りを覚える」と、前環境省自然環境局長の亀沢玲治氏は言う。「その手の批判が当てはまるとは、私は思いません」

象牙業界の幹部も同様に、自分たちは環境保護論者とメディアによる魔女狩りの被害者だと主張している。2017年に東京で開かれたはんこの見本市で、象牙はんこ大手のタカイチは、保護団体からの「執拗な嫌がらせと圧力」を訴える掲示を出した。2011年、当時の同社会長で日本象牙美術工芸組合連合会の前会長でもあった高市景夫氏と息子が、象牙58本の違法取引で共に起訴されたことを考えると、この掲示は厚かましい主張だった。同社は100万円の罰金を科され、高市氏と息子はそれぞれ懲役1年、懲役10カ月(いずれも執行猶予付き)の判決を受けている。

高市氏はインタビューの申し込みに返答しなかったが、彼の裁判での陳述は、日本の象牙業者にかかっているプレッシャーの大きさを示す。「象牙がもう日本に入ってこないというのは、悩ましいことです」と高市氏は述べた。そして、氏を違法行為に駆り立てたのは「差し迫った危機感」だったという。

象牙をめぐるムードについて業者たちは口を閉ざしているため、それ以上判断するのは難しい。東京象牙美術工芸協同組合の担当者は、「ジャーナリストは一切信用しません」と、私の通訳に電話で告げた。10人ほどの他の組合員も同様に取材の申し込みを拒否した。あるメーカーは、自分や同業者が、協同組合や経済産業省のある人物から、ジャーナリストと話をしないように警告されているとほのめかしさえした。経済産業省の相川敬子氏は、このような警告についての情報を一切否定した。

そんな中、日本象牙美術工芸組合連合会のあるメンバーが取材に応じた。パイプ業界の大物である柘恭三郎氏だ。同氏はもう象牙は扱ってはいないが、業界における歴史と影響力から名誉会員に名を連ねている。柘氏個人の象牙コレクションには、100以上の彫刻のほか、無数の根付、パイプ、杖、たばこ入れ、全形の牙などがある。「象牙とは、私にとって単に金銭的な価値ではありません」と彼は言う。「私にとって本当に大切なのは、作品の芸術的、歴史的、そして精神的と言ってもいい価値です」

日本での象牙取引の行方について、象牙製品のメーカーは「非常に心配し、神経質になっています」と柘氏は言う。「法律を忠実に守って取引している人たちは、自分たちの扱われ方に脅威を感じているのです」。柘氏とその友人たちに関する限り、日本の業者は問題となる象牙取引を行っていない。 「日本の取引ではすべて登録され、すべてが合法であり、すべてが追跡可能です」と柘氏は話す。「しかし、ルールに従わない国が非常に多いため、日本が疑われ、同じ規制やその厳格化に悩まされているのです」

柘氏が言う「他国」は、実は1カ国しかない。

「間違いなく中国人です」と柘氏は言い、日本の業者にとっては「中国人との密輸ビジネスに引きずり込まれるか、彼らともども逮捕される危険があります」と付け加えた。

これは推測にとどまらない。EIAが2人の調査員を雇い、象牙を日本国外に持ち出そうとする中国人バイヤーを装わせたところ、接触した4つの卸売業者はいずれも売買の用意ができていた。それどころか、買ってくれそうなバイヤーに対し、どの業者も「これまでに中国人と取引をしてきた」と告げて安心させた。「我々があまりに多くの象牙を(中国人に)売ったので、日本から象牙が消えそうなくらいです」。ある業者はこう豪語した。また別の業者は、中国人との取引で象牙の価格が「急騰」しているとも話した。

View Images

長野のある英語教師は訪問販売で2人の子供に象牙のはんこを買った。幸運をもたらすと販売員に言われたためだ。はんこに50万円(4500ドル)を支払い、別のお守りも購入したが、それだけの価値はあったと考えている。「はんこは人の運命を左右すると信じています。だから、息子と娘には最高のはんこを与えたいと思いました」。この英語教師は匿名を希望している。はんこの購入後、ある友人から、象牙を持っていると世界に宣言するのは「よくない」と言われたためだ。

違法な象牙取引の動向を追跡するのにCITESが使っているツール「エレファント・トレード・インフォメーション・システム」が、中国で報告されている象牙押収データを分析している。未発表の分析結果によれば、2011年から2016年まで、中国に入ってくる象牙の出所となっている国のランキングで、日本はナイジェリア、タンザニア、ベトナムに次いで4位だった。この間、トラフィック・ジャパンが記録した違法象牙の押収は100件以上、合計2.15トン。「日本から中国に渡る象牙の量という点で、これは氷山の一角かもしれません」と、トラフィック・ジャパン代表の北出智美氏は語る。

象牙を海外に送るのは違法だが、日本国内で外国人のバイヤーに売ることは違法ではない。警視庁は昨年11月、象牙のはんこ605本を中国行きの船に積み込もうとした中国人船員を逮捕した。その後の捜査で、別の中国籍の人物と、全日本象牙卸売センター(東京)取締役の土屋雅右氏が疑われ、2人とも今年初めに逮捕された。土屋氏は、自分が象牙を売った中国人客が、それを国外に持ち出そうとしていたとは思いもしなかったと主張し、検察はこの件を不起訴とした。

中国では象牙取引の禁止が新たに定められたにもかかわらず、需要は依然として大きい。トラフィックの中国事務所は、違法販売がインターネット上で続いていること、今でも観光客が象牙を買い、自国に密輸していることを明らかにしている。

「日本を含む法執行力の弱い近隣諸国が、合法および違法の象牙市場を閉鎖しなければ、中国に流入する違法取引を抑えることはできません」。トラフィック中国事務所トップのチョウ・フェイ氏はこう語る。旅行サイト「トリップアドバイザー」の分析によると、2016年に日本を訪れた旅行者は2400万人という記録的な数だった。その大半は東アジアからであり、中国人の訪日への関心は2015年から2016年にかけて130%増加したという。

今のところ、日本は要請に応えていない。10月8日に公開予定のEIAの報告書によると、調査員が接触した300を超すはんこの売り手のうち60%近くが、客が象牙を日本国外に持ち出すのを心配していないことが分かったという。中には、象牙を海外に郵送するという違法行為を申し出る業者さえあった。

どのくらいの象牙が日本に残っているのかを確認することは不可能だが、当局は、残った象牙がなくなれば、この産業は自然になくなると主張する。一方で自然保護論者たちは、取っておいた分が枯渇すれば、新たに密猟されたゾウ由来の牙を密輸する誘惑は抗いがたいものになるだろうと警告している。

すでにそうなっている可能性がある。2015年、北京にある全国森林警察局司法鑑定センターの元所長だったホアン・チィン氏は、最近殺されたゾウに由来すると思われる日本からの押収象牙約590キロ以上を調べた。外側の表面は垢やほこりでかなり汚れている一方、エナメルは湿り、牙にはひび割れやかびがない。2008年の合法的な輸出品という可能性もあるが、ホアン氏は「全体的に、こうした特徴は最近採った牙に見られるもので、採取から5年は超えないと思われます」と指摘している。

日本の象牙規制にひびが入っている兆候がありながら、公式見解は変わらない。日本は象牙市場の閉鎖を考えていないというものだ。環境省の亀沢玲治氏は、「象牙の合法的な所有者がその象牙の正当な取引を行う権利を、否定するべきではありません」と述べている。

「象牙取引の維持は」と、柘氏が付け加えた。「政府と業界団体が合意していることです」

6月、高まる批判を払拭するため、また規制強化を求める声も踏まえ、日本は象牙取引の規制法を改正した。しかし、当局が選んだのは象牙製品の直接規制ではなく、事業者に対する監督権の強化だった。現在、国内に300ある象牙製品メーカーと8200の小売業者は5年ごとに登録を更新しなければならず、政府が象牙取引の申請を却下することが初めて可能になった。

また事業者は、所有する全形の象牙をすべて登録しなければならず、かつ今までと同様、すべての売上を紙の台帳で自ら報告しなければならない。罰金の最高額は、個人または企業の場合は100万円だったが、企業は1億円、個人は500万円に引き上げられた。一方、環境省は地方の事務所に職員を4人新たに増員し、絶滅危惧種の取引の監視に当たらせることにした。

JTEFの坂元雅行氏は、こうした方策はうわべを飾っただけだと言う。「この官庁の慣行は分かっているので、業者を真剣に監督するとは思いません」と坂元氏。「この『監督』の目的は、業界を保護することなのです」

EIAのアラン・ソーントン氏も、「わずかでも状況を変えるような点は、新しい法律には全くありません」と評する。

日本の当局者は同意しない。環境省の堀上氏が言うように、「法改正は効果があると信じて」いる。

「象牙を使う必要はない」

日本で象牙を使う人の一部は、国内取引の禁止は不可避であり、むしろ歓迎すべきとさえ見なすようになった。「私たちは象牙の芸術家ではなく、根付の芸術家です」と話すのは、国際根付彫刻会会長の黒岩明氏は言う。「象牙を使う必要はありません」

明治時代に作られたような大型の象牙彫刻を制作する日本人は、今はほとんどいない。一方、根付の職人技は、少数の作家や熱心な収集家の間でちょっとしたカムバックを見せている。高円宮妃久子さまも愛好家の1人だ。多くの作家は現在、木、シカの角、金属、水牛の角、プラスチック、石などさまざまな素材を使っている。だが、京都清宗根付館の主任学芸員、伊達淳士氏によれば、多くの人にとって象牙は今も最高の地位にあるという。

Pull Quote
ジャーナリストは一切信用しません。
東京象牙美術工芸協同組合の担当者

受賞歴のある東京の根付作家、及川空観氏は「素材そのものが美しく、色は温かく、耐久性があります」と話す。しかし及川氏は、違法取引に加担する可能性があるなら象牙を使うつもりはない。もし使えば、「私の顧客も芸術も裏切ることになるでしょう」と及川氏。

黒岩氏らと同様、及川氏は象牙の時代は終わりつつあると考え、それに応じた用意をしている。氏の工房で、筆者は小さな木箱を手渡された。中に納められていたのは小さな白ウサギだった。赤い目が輝き、まるで生きているかのようだった。一見、象牙と見分けがつかないが、エルフォリンというプラスチックの一種だという。及川氏が象牙の代用として探求している素材の1つだ。「象牙のように見えながら象牙ではない素材を見つけて、この彫刻技術を存続させたいと考えています」と及川氏は言う。

一部のはんこメーカーもこの考え方に同意している。すでに象牙はんこの販売から手を引いた業者がいくつかあるほか、象牙はんこの流行に最初に火をつけた宗家日本印相協会を含む数社が代用品を検討している。同社セールスプロモーション部門の磯野拓巳氏は、「日本が違法市場の一部であることを完全に否定はできない以上、世界が進む方向に従う必要があると思います」と言う。

世界最大の象牙のオンラインプラットフォームであるYahoo! JAPANは、この問題について方針を変えていない(同社の広報担当者は「日本文化を尊重する」必要性を挙げている)。一方、他の大手小売業者は積極的に対策を取っている。坂元氏が以前に調査したEコマース企業の楽天は、2017年に象牙製品の販売を禁止。有名な小売グループのイオンもすでに象牙を店舗から段階的に撤去し、モールのテナントにも2020年までに同様の対応を求めている。

「生物多様性の保全と持続可能性のための、会社独自の基準に従っているだけです」と、イオンのグループ環境・社会貢献部長、金丸治子氏は言う。「この件を進めるにあたり、国際社会と協力していきます」

一部の当局者はこのような心情に同意しつつ、通常そのような考えは自分たちの内にとどめている。「もっと広い国際社会の誰もが前進しているのなら、後ろに下がったまま象牙市場を求めている我々に何の意味があるのでしょうか」と、環境事務次官の森本英香氏は話す。「違法な象牙取引で利益を得ている少数の集団には憤りを覚えます。日本が野生動物保護のために現に行っている施策を、彼らは全て曇らせ、我々の評判を台無しにしているのです」

坂元氏は、日本の政策を変える最大の希望は外圧だと考えている。英国のボリス・ジョンソン前外相は今年7月、辞任の前に日本の河野太郎外相に対し、象牙取引を法律で禁止するよう促した。米国の当局者もこの動きに加わっている。

「私たちは、象牙市場を閉鎖することで違法な象牙取引を減らすよう、他の国々と同様に日本にも働きかけてきました」と米国務省海洋・国際環境・科学局のジュディ・ガーバー副次官補主任は述べている。「国内の象牙市場を維持すれば、違法取引の隠蔽に加担し、野生生物の密輸一掃に向けて共同で行ってきたあらゆる取り組みを複雑化させる可能性があります」

日本がこのメッセージに耳を傾けるのか、それとも世界最後の象牙取引の避難所の1つであり続けるのかはまだ分からない。しかしその間にも、毎年何千頭ものゾウが牙のために密猟され続けている。坂元雅行氏はこう話す。「国際社会にとって、いま日本を脱落させないことは極めて重要です。ゾウに次のチャンスが与えられることはもうないでしょうから」

訳=ルーバー荒井ハンナ、高野夏美、米井香織

レイチェル・ニューワー: フリーランスのジャーナリストで書籍「密猟:野生動物取引の闇(未邦訳、原題はPoached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking)」の著者。米国ニューヨーク、ブルックリン在住。

ブレント - スタートン:ドキュメンタリーフォトグラファー、ナショナルジオグラフィックへの貢献者

今回の調査は、国際交流基金日米センターが米国社会科学評議会との共催で運営する研究奨学制度「安倍フェローシップ・プログラム」の助成を受けて実施された。
ワイルドライフ・ウォッチ(Wildlife Watch)は、ナショナル ジオグラフィック協会とナショナル ジオグラフィック・パートナーズが野生動物に関する犯罪や搾取に焦点を当てる調査報道プロジェクト。 ワイルドライフ・ウォッチの記事をもっと読むにはこちら. 非営利組織ナショナル ジオグラフィック協会についてもっと知りたい方はこちら: nationalgeographic.org . 情報提供やご意見はこちらまでお送りください: ngwildlife@natgeo.com.