<p>For the first time, scientists have decoded the full-body color patterns of a<a title="dinosaur" href="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/prehistoric-world/">dinosaur</a>—the 155-million-year-old&nbsp;<i>Anchiornis huxleyi&nbsp;</i>(pictured)<i>—</i>a new study in the journal&nbsp;<i><a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/">Science</a></i>&nbsp;says. (<a title="Read in-depth coverage" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100127-dinosaurs-color-feathers-science/o/">Read in-depth coverage</a>.)</p> <p>That may sound familiar, given&nbsp;<a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100127-dinosaur-feathers-colors-nature/">last week's announcement of the first scientifically verified dinosaur color scheme</a>.</p> <p>But the previous research, published in&nbsp;<i><a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/index.html">Nature</a>,</i>&nbsp;had found pigments only on a few isolated parts of dinosaurs (<a title="see pictures" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/photogalleries/100127-new-dinosaur-colors-feathers-nature-pictures/#025714_600x450.jpg">see pictures</a>)—and had used less rigorous methods for assigning colors to the fossilized, filament-like "protofeathers" found on some dinosaur specimens, say authors of the new report.</p> <p>(See a&nbsp;<a title="new 3-D National Geographic animation of Anchiornis" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100127-dinosaurs-color-feathers-science/o/">new 3-D&nbsp;<i>National Geographic&nbsp;</i>animation of Anchiornis</a><i>.</i>)</p> <p>—Chris Sloan,&nbsp;<a href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/"><i>National Geographic</i>&nbsp;magazine</a>&nbsp;senior editor</p>

Dino-pecker?

For the first time, scientists have decoded the full-body color patterns of adinosaur—the 155-million-year-old Anchiornis huxleyi (pictured)a new study in the journal Science says. (Read in-depth coverage.)

That may sound familiar, given last week's announcement of the first scientifically verified dinosaur color scheme.

But the previous research, published in Nature, had found pigments only on a few isolated parts of dinosaurs (see pictures)—and had used less rigorous methods for assigning colors to the fossilized, filament-like "protofeathers" found on some dinosaur specimens, say authors of the new report.

(See a new 3-D National Geographic animation of Anchiornis.)

—Chris Sloan, National Geographic magazine senior editor

Illustration by National Geographic

True-Color Dinosaur Pictures: First Full-Body Rendering

See the woodpecker-like dinosaur that's made history as the first to be fully and scientifically colored—and the feathery fossil that spawned the new view.

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