<p class="Normal">In their quest for a fresh approach to photographing wildlife, English brothers Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas had a wild idea: a remote-controlled, camera-equipped buggy (pictured with its inventors in summer 2009).</p><p class="Normal">"It is difficult to produce original shots without really pushing the boundaries and striving for new perspectives," the brothers wrote on their <a id="hwh:" title="blog" href="http://blog.burrard-lucas.com/2010/04/adventures-of-beetlecam/">blog</a>. "Often, this means putting the camera into places that may at first seem impossible."</p><p class="Normal">The photographers traveled to animal-rich southwestern <a id="wlfp" title="Tanzania" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/tanzania-guide/">Tanzania</a>, where they tested their invention, called BeetleCam. (See more <a id="bqw_" title="pictures of Tanzania's wildlife." href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/tanzania-photos/#african-elephant-tanzania_3648_600x450.jpg">pictures of Tanzanian animals</a>.)</p><p>Outfitted with powerful motors, off-road tires, long-lasting batteries, and a digital SLR camera, BeetleCam was soon ready for the bush. But pictures released April 19 showed that the device wasn't quite ready for a certain curious predator.</p>

BeetleCam

In their quest for a fresh approach to photographing wildlife, English brothers Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas had a wild idea: a remote-controlled, camera-equipped buggy (pictured with its inventors in summer 2009).

"It is difficult to produce original shots without really pushing the boundaries and striving for new perspectives," the brothers wrote on their blog. "Often, this means putting the camera into places that may at first seem impossible."

The photographers traveled to animal-rich southwestern Tanzania, where they tested their invention, called BeetleCam. (See more pictures of Tanzanian animals.)

Outfitted with powerful motors, off-road tires, long-lasting batteries, and a digital SLR camera, BeetleCam was soon ready for the bush. But pictures released April 19 showed that the device wasn't quite ready for a certain curious predator.

Image by Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas

Pictures: Lion Steals Roving Camera, "Takes" Photos

This time, curiosity killed the camera: A lion mangled the remote-controlled BeetleCam—after taking a few pictures of African wilderness.

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