<p><strong>A river-spanning spider web dwarfs a park ranger in <a id="yvek" title="Madagascar" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/madagascar-guide/">Madagascar</a> in 2008. Made of the world's strongest known biological material, the web is the product of a new species, the Darwin's bark spider, which makes the world's largest webs of any single spider, new studies say.</strong></p><p>Zoologist Ingi Agnarsson and colleagues have found Darwin's bark spider webs as wide as 82 feet (25 meters)—about as long as two city buses.</p><p>In Andasibe-Mantadia National Park (pictured), "the park rangers knew about them, and I think they've shown them to tourists for a while," said Agnarsson, of the <a id="hens" title="University of Puerto Rico" href="http://biology.uprrp.edu/department_info/index.html">University of Puerto Rico</a>.</p><p>But the Darwin's bark spider and its record-breaking webs were unknown to science until they were documented by the team, whose findings appear this week in the <em><a id="vxyt" title="Journal of Arachnology" href="http://www.americanarachnology.org/JOA_online.html">Journal of Arachnology</a> </em>and <em><a id="kibi" title="PLoS ONE" href="http://www.plosone.org/home.action">PLoS ONE</a>.</em></p><p>(Related: <a id="nft1" title="&quot;Largest Web-Spinning Spider Found.&quot;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/10/091021-largest-web-spinning-spider.html">"Largest Web-Spinning Spider Found."</a>)</p><p><em>—Ker Than</em></p>

River-Spanning Spider Web

A river-spanning spider web dwarfs a park ranger in Madagascar in 2008. Made of the world's strongest known biological material, the web is the product of a new species, the Darwin's bark spider, which makes the world's largest webs of any single spider, new studies say.

Zoologist Ingi Agnarsson and colleagues have found Darwin's bark spider webs as wide as 82 feet (25 meters)—about as long as two city buses.

In Andasibe-Mantadia National Park (pictured), "the park rangers knew about them, and I think they've shown them to tourists for a while," said Agnarsson, of the University of Puerto Rico.

But the Darwin's bark spider and its record-breaking webs were unknown to science until they were documented by the team, whose findings appear this week in the Journal of Arachnology and PLoS ONE.

(Related: "Largest Web-Spinning Spider Found.")

—Ker Than

Photograph courtesy Matjaz Kuntner

Photos: World's Biggest, Strongest Spider Webs Found

A new spider species in Madagascar weaves 80-foot webs out of the world's toughest biological material, new studies say.

Read This Next

Electric cars are powered by rare metals. Can AI help find them?
How to keep the red wolf from going extinct for a second time
This plant no longer exists. But you can still smell it.

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet