<p><strong>A <a id="pywt" title="great white sharks" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/fish/great-white-shark.html">great white shark</a> takes a bite from a dead Brydes whale (<a id="ru48" title="pictures" href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/10/brydes-whales/cole-photography">see pictures</a>) in False Bay, <a id="mj_d" title="South Africa" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/south-africa-guide/?source=A-to-Z">South Africa</a>, on September 10.</strong><br><br> The whale carcass was methodically stripped by at least 30 great whites—but without a violent feeding frenzy that can sometimes occur, witness Alison Kock, of the <a id="xf_s" title="Save Our Seas Shark Centre" href="http://saveourseas.com/projects/whitesharks_za">Save Our Seas Shark Centre</a>, said by email.<br><br> "It was extraordinary to see so many sharks and so little aggression," said Kock, who spent nine days at sea watching the fish scour the carcass clean.<br><br> "With such abundant food on offer, there was no need for fierce competition between them," Kock said.</p><p>(<a id="cqou" title="Watch a related video: &quot;Carnivore Sharks.&quot;" href="http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/videos/feeds/cv-seo/Nat-Geo-Wild/Predation/Carnivore-Sharks-3.html">Watch a related video: "Carnivore Sharks."</a>)</p>

Whale of a Meal

A great white shark takes a bite from a dead Brydes whale (see pictures) in False Bay, South Africa, on September 10.

The whale carcass was methodically stripped by at least 30 great whites—but without a violent feeding frenzy that can sometimes occur, witness Alison Kock, of the Save Our Seas Shark Centre, said by email.

"It was extraordinary to see so many sharks and so little aggression," said Kock, who spent nine days at sea watching the fish scour the carcass clean.

"With such abundant food on offer, there was no need for fierce competition between them," Kock said.

(Watch a related video: "Carnivore Sharks.")

Photograph from Barcroft/Fame Pictures

Photos: Great Whites "Take Turns" Feeding on Dead Whale

A veritable swarm of great whites tucked into a whale carcass in South African waters earlier this month—and kept their table manners, says a scientist who witnessed the rare event.

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