<p><strong>A male northern white-cheeked gibbon (left) and a mother carrying her baby hang out in a treetop in <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/vietnam-guide/">Vietnam</a>'s Pu Mat National Park in a recent picture.</strong></p><p>The animals are part of a newfound population of more than 400 of the gibbons, which are deemed critically endangered in Vietnam and <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/laos-guide/">Laos</a> by the <a href="http://www.iucn.org/">International Union for Conservation of Nature</a>. The gibbons, which have declined due to widespread hunting and logging&nbsp;of their habitat, are likely extinct in <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/china-guide/">China</a>.<a href="http://www.conservation.org/Pages/default.aspx"></a></p><p><a href="http://www.conservation.org/Pages/default.aspx">Conservation International</a> had been searching for the rare primates since 2008, finding only a few scattered groups—until now. New auditory sampling surveys—during which researchers record the calls of gibbon "families"—have revealed that Pu Mat is home to 130 gibbon groups, for an overall population of roughly 455 individuals.</p><p>(See <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/07/070703-monkey-pictures.html">pictures: "Rare Monkeys Spotted in Vietnam [2007]."</a>)</p><p>The discovery of such a large gibbon population may mean the species has a better chance of long-term survival, the scientists say.</p><p><em>—Rachel Kaufman</em></p>

Family Time

A male northern white-cheeked gibbon (left) and a mother carrying her baby hang out in a treetop in Vietnam's Pu Mat National Park in a recent picture.

The animals are part of a newfound population of more than 400 of the gibbons, which are deemed critically endangered in Vietnam and Laos by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The gibbons, which have declined due to widespread hunting and logging of their habitat, are likely extinct in China.

Conservation International had been searching for the rare primates since 2008, finding only a few scattered groups—until now. New auditory sampling surveys—during which researchers record the calls of gibbon "families"—have revealed that Pu Mat is home to 130 gibbon groups, for an overall population of roughly 455 individuals.

(See pictures: "Rare Monkeys Spotted in Vietnam [2007].")

The discovery of such a large gibbon population may mean the species has a better chance of long-term survival, the scientists say.

—Rachel Kaufman

Photograph courtesy Terry Whittaker, Conservation International

Pictures: Hundreds of Rare Gibbons Found in Vietnam

More than 400 endangered northern white-cheeked gibbons have been discovered in a Vietnam park, conservationists say.

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