WATCH: Meet Sparklemuffin, Skeletorus, and Elephans, three species of peacock spiders recently described by Jürgen Otto and David Hill.

Video courtesy: Jürgen Otto

If you don't think of spiders as cute and cuddly, then you’ve never met Sparklemuffin, Skeletorus, and the elephant spider. Scientists have identified these three new species of peacock spiders in various parts of eastern Australia.

Less than a quarter-inch long (five millimeters), male peacock spiders are known for their bright colors and a rolling-shaking mating dance that would make Miley Cyrus jealous.

Skeletorus (Maratus sceletus) got its name from the white markings on the males' dark limbs, which give them the look of a skeleton. Sparklemuffin was the pet name Maddie Girard, a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Berkeley, gave Maratus jactatus, which has blue and red stripes on its midsection. The report describing these spiders was published on January

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