A member of the Humane Society International team rescues a baby goat on May 1. The earthquake devastated the Lalipur District, killing many livestock and companion animals. (See 20 heartbreaking pictures that reveal Nepal's devastation.)

Baby Goat

A member of the Humane Society International team rescues a baby goat on May 1. The earthquake devastated the Lalipur District, killing many livestock and companion animals. (See 20 heartbreaking pictures that reveal Nepal's devastation.)
Photograph by Jodi Hilton, AP Images for Humane Society International

Pictures: Baby Goats, More Animal Survivors Rescued in Nepal

An animal-rescue team is scouring villages near Kathmandu to help the four-legged survivors of the devastating earthquake, many of which are important to their families as sources of income or pets.

The devastating human toll of the Nepal earthquake has been well documented, but the quake also wreaked havoc on many animals, which will make the return to normalcy for people that much harder.

In rural Nepal, domestic animals are traditionally kept below the house, which means many were killed when their homes collapsed. So many rural survivors of the quake are now without a primary source of food and income.

Many of the animal survivors, including pets, are left with no one to care for them.

They're in need of the same assistance as humans: food, water, and shelter. (See "10 Pictures You Haven't Seen Reveal Destruction Deep In Nepal.")

Humane Society International has dispatched a rescue team to provide emergency veterinary aid and care for the earthquake's animal survivors, including  baby goats, cows, and dogs.

The society and other relief organizations, such as the Animal Welfare Network of Nepal in Kathmandu, are working to provide the basic necessities to both people in Nepal and to their livestock and pets.

Their work also benefits the human survivors, many of whom have a close emotional bond with their furry companions and would go to great lengths to save them.

"People are willing to put their own lives at risk to stay with their companion animals," said Joann Lindenmayer, senior manager of disaster operations at Humane Society International. "They're family members."

Keep clicking for recent photos taken during animal-rescue operations in villages near Kathmandu.

 

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