<p>Named the Rhinoceros chameleon because of the horn-like projection on its head, this species is <a href="http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/172758/0">listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)</a>.</p>

On the Edge

Named the Rhinoceros chameleon because of the horn-like projection on its head, this species is listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Chameleons Can't Hide in These Award-Winning Photos

This collection of close-ups from Madagascar shows chameleons are much more than masters of camouflage.

Chameleons are well-known for their ability to change color and blend in with their surroundings, but that’s only part of what makes them fascinating. Chameleons have some of the fastest tongues on Earth, and their eyes are telescopic. Also, at least half of the species of chameleons are threatened or near threatened, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

National Geographic explored the world of chameleons in a recent magazine story, with photos from Christian Ziegler. The photos, featured here, capture the incredible habits of chameleons in Madagascar, which is home to more than half of the world’s chameleon species. With these photos, Ziegler won third prize in the Nature category in the 59th Annual World Press Photo Contest.

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