When Are You Allowed to Kill a Grizzly?

The death of Scarface, a famous Yellowstone bear, has inflamed a fight over protections.

Last week the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks announced that a grizzly bear died of a gunshot wound last November just outside Yellowstone National Park.

This wasn’t any old bear. Although his official name was No. 211, people called him Scarface. That’s because he had a damaged ear and scars on the right side of his face, likely the result of scuffles with other male grizzlies over females and deer carcasses.

His recognizable appearance and tendency to roam within view of roads caught the attention of tourists and wildlife fans alike, who took to social media this week to mourn the animal’s death.

Scientists also knew the bear well. He managed to get captured and released 17 times,

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