Namibia’s wild elephant sales draw global condemnation

The southwest African country denies it violated an international wildlife treaty.

Today, at a France-based global summit on the international treaty that regulates the wildlife trade, numerous countries condemned Namibia for its recent international sale and export of 22 wild African elephants.

Namibia says it has more than 24,000 elephants and that roundups of elephants are essential to alleviate potentially lethal encounters with humans and to raise money for conservation and wildlife management. Last year, elephants killed three people, and there have been numerous claims of crop damage in recent years, according to data the Namibian government shared with National Geographic.

The United Kingdom, among others, raised a number of questions about Namibia’s elephant export which appears to violate the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild

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