A male and female mallard photographed at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park in Eatonville, Washington
A male and female mallard photographed at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park in Eatonville, Washington
Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark

Mallard

Common Name:
Mallard Duck
Scientific Name:
Anas platyrhynchos
Type:
Birds
Diet:
Omnivore
Group Name:
Sord (in flight)
Average Life Span In The Wild:
5 to 10 years
Average Life Span In Captivity:
Up to 10 years
Size:
20 to 26 inches
Weight:
2 to 3 pounds
IUCN Red List Status:
Least concern
Current Population Trend:
Decreasing

The green head and yellow bill of the mallard duck is a familiar sight to many people living in the Northern hemisphere. In fact, the mallard is thought to be the most abundant and wide-ranging duck on Earth.

Habitat

Mallards prefer calm, shallow sanctuaries, but can be found in almost any body of freshwater across Asia, Europe, and North America. They’re also found in saltwater and brackish water and are commonly found in wetlands.

Male vs. Female

The male, or drake, is the more distinctively colored of the mallards. Its iconic green head sits atop a white neckband that sets off a chestnut-colored chest and gray body. Females are mottled drab brown in color, but sport iridescent purple-blue wing feathers that are visible as a patch on their sides. They grow to about 26 inches in length and can weigh up to 3 pounds.

Behavior and Reproduction

Mallard groups can often be seen head dipping or completely upending in the water. They rarely dive though, spending their time near the surface and dabbling for invertebrates, fish, amphibians, and a variety of plants. They also graze on land, feeding on grains and plants.

Mated pairs migrate to and breed in the northern parts of their range and build nests on the ground or in a protected cavity. They normally lay about a dozen eggs, and the incubation period lasts just under a month. Mallards are territorial during much of this period, but once incubation is well underway, males abandon the nest and join a flock of other males.

Most mallard species are common and not considered threatened. However one threat to their populations includes hybridization with other ducks.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our photo community on Instagram. Follow us on Instagram at @natgeoyourshot or visit us at natgeo.com/yourshot for the latest submissions and news about the community.
This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our photo community on Instagram. Follow us on Instagram at @natgeoyourshot or visit us at natgeo.com/yourshot for the latest submissions and news about the community.
Photograph by Ivete Basso, National Geographic Your Shot

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