A clouded leopard photographed at Houston Zoo in Texas
A clouded leopard photographed at Houston Zoo in Texas
Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark

Clouded Leopard

Common Name:
Clouded Leopard
Scientific Name:
Neofelis nebulosa
Type:
Mammals
Diet:
Carnivore
Group Name:
Leap
Size:
Body: 2 to 3 feet; tail: up to 3 feet
Weight:
Up to 50 pounds
IUCN Red List Status:
Vulnerable
Current Population Trend:
Decreasing

This beautiful Asian cat, named for its spotted coat, is seldom seen in the wild, and its habits remain a bit mysterious. Clouded leopards roam the hunting grounds of Asia from the rain forests of Indonesia to the foothills of the Nepali Himalayas. Though little information is known about their population sizes, they are considered a vulnerable species.

Arboreal Adaptations

Most cats are good climbers, but the clouded leopard is near the top of its class. These big cats can even hang upside down beneath large branches, using their large paws and sharp claws to secure a good grip. Clouded leopards have short, powerful legs equipped with rotating rear ankles that allow them to safely downclimb in a headfirst posture—much like a common squirrel. Sharp eyesight helps them judge distances well, and the cats use their long tails to maintain balance.

Behavior in the Wild

Though clouded leopards are great climbers, scientists believe that they do most of their hunting on the ground, feasting on deer, pigs, monkeys, and smaller fare such as squirrels or birds. They are aided in their hunting by the largest canine teeth (proportionate to body size) of any wild cat.

Scientists are not sure exactly how clouded leopards act in the wild. They are probably solitary animals, like most cats. Females give birth to a litter of one to five cubs every year, and the young leopards remain dependent upon their mother for about ten months.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our photo community on Instagram. Follow us on Instagram at @natgeoyourshot or visit us at natgeo.com/yourshot for the latest submissions and news about the community.
This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our photo community on Instagram. Follow us on Instagram at @natgeoyourshot or visit us at natgeo.com/yourshot for the latest submissions and news about the community.
Photograph by F. Belz, National Geographic Your Shot

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