As Global Food Chain Grows, So Does Risk of Illness

A few years ago, I was bored on a long flight and struck up a conversation with a man sitting in my row. It turned out he worked in food production, which was automatically interesting to me.

The conversation turned fascinating, though, when he described just what he did: He was involved in the production of frozen fish, the kind that you buy in a supermarket: sliced into servings, breaded and packed into boxes. The fish that I bought in a U.S. supermarket, he said, was probably caught in American waters, shipped to Asia to be sliced, breaded and packed, and shipped back across the ocean to be sold again.

I’d always known that some of the food I buy came from

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