Of Black Pineapple and Graveyards: Pop-Up Dining is Hot

I walk hesitantly through an unmarked door, blinking into the dimness of a strange room and stomping snow off my boots. The heady scent of exotic spices wafts out from a kitchen filled with the muffled thump of trays being loaded just out of view. Someone checks my name and hands me a drink and I stumble for a prime seat near a good-looking stranger at a long, communal table.

That’s how supper club starts. Or, at least, how a recent underground Dinner Lab event I attended in Washington, D.C. called “The Black Pineapple, a Tribute to Antigua,” recently started.

The black pineapple is a fruit unique to the island and its official symbol. It looks like a Hawaiian pineapple, except it’s ripe when it’s still dark green, and so

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