'If the camel is fine, our life is fine.' But Somali camel herding is in jeopardy.

More frequent and extreme droughts are destroying the age-old Somali camel-herding tradition, leaving thousands of villagers in limbo.

Baruud, a five-month-old camel, tugs at Cadar Maxamed’s hijab in Xijiinle, a village on the northern coast of Somaliland. Baruud, which means tough in Somali, was given the name after his mother survived a devastating drought while she was pregnant with him. Millions of Somalia’s camels and other livestock died in successive drought years that began in 2015.

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