Who was Saint Patrick and why does he have a day?

St. Paddy's Day is mostly a U.S.-based event, though cities around the world do celebrate with lots of green and lots of beer.

St. Patrick's Day has been celebrated for centuries. But what are the holiday's origins, and who exactly was St. Patrick? Learn about the patron saint of Ireland, why St. Patrick's Day is associated with four-leafed clovers, and how the American Revolution contributed to the growth of this once minor religious holiday.

Who was Saint Patrick and why does he have a day?

St. Paddy's Day is mostly a U.S.-based event, though cities around the world do celebrate with lots of green and lots of beer.

St. Patrick's Day has been celebrated for centuries. But what are the holiday's origins, and who exactly was St. Patrick? Learn about the patron saint of Ireland, why St. Patrick's Day is associated with four-leafed clovers, and how the American Revolution contributed to the growth of this once minor religious holiday.

St. Patrick’s Day is a cultural and religious holiday held annually on March 17. Named after the patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick, the day celebrates Irish heritage with food, parades, drinks, Irish lore, and an assortment of green-colored things—green beer, anyone?

Today the holiday is celebrated around the world, with much of the modern traditions inspired by Irish expatriots in the United States.

Who was Saint Patrick?

Maewyn Succat wasn’t particularly religious growing up—or even Irish, for that matter—so it’s a bit surprising that he became patron saint of Ireland.

Born in Britain around A.D. 390, Maewyn grew up in a well-to-do Christian family, complete with slaves and property. At 16, however, Maewyn was kidnapped and whisked away to Ireland where he himself became a slave and tended sheep for six or seven years; accounts differ. It was then that Maewyn became deeply religious.

Pull Quote
I used to stay out in the forests and on the mountain and I would wake up before daylight to pray in the snow, in icy coldness, in rain, and I used to feel neither ill nor any slothfulness, because, as I now see, the Spirit was burning in me at that time.
- Saint Patrick, Confessio, translated from Latin

Eventually, legend has it, Maewyn began to hear voices, one of which told him to escape back to Britain. He managed to gain passage on a ship, but once he reunited with his family, the voice told him to return to Ireland.

Before returning, he was ordained as a priest and changed his name to Patricius, or Patrick, inspired by the Latin root “patr-” for “father.”

At the time, most of Ireland was pagan and progress was hard-won by the missionary—he was often beaten and imprisoned by Irish royalty and pagan chiefs. After his death, he was largely forgotten. But then, slowly, the legend around Patrick grew until he was honored as the patron saint of Ireland.

St. Patrick’s Day, the American way

St. Patrick’s Day started as a minor religious holiday in 1631. The church declared it a feast day—pubs closed and observers went to church. The original holiday bears little resemblance to today’s festivities full of parades, drinking, and green Irish food.

The first St. Patrick’s Day parade was in America during the Revolutionary War. Irish soldiers fighting for the British marched in in New York City in 1762. Since then, the tradition has spread throughout the U.S. and abroad, including Ireland.

Similarly, the food most associated with the holiday—corned beef with cabbage and potatoes—also started in the United States.

During the Irish potato famine from 1845-52, nearly one million Irish emigrated to the United States. Discriminated against and poor, Irish-Americans began eating corned beef from neighboring Jewish butchers and delis. The corned beef, simmered with cabbage, turnips, or potatoes, was inexpensive and became a staple. Over time, this Irish-American tradition became closely associated with St. Patrick’s Day itself, even though people in Ireland rarely ate beef.

As for the St. Patrick Day drink of choice, Guinness originated in Ireland and their flagship brew, Guinness Stout, is still brewed in their famous St. James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin. St. Patrick’s Day revelers consumed 13 million pints of Guinness on the holiday in 2017.

The color green

On St. Patrick’s Day, cities across the world turn iconic monuments green: the Sydney Opera House, the Pyramids at Giza, and the Eiffel Tower are all lit with green lights. The Chicago River is dyed bright green. In the U.S., people who don’t wear the color green on St. Patrick’s Day are pinched.

Green is the color of St. Patrick’s Day, but why?

According to some scholars, the color green only became associated with Ireland and St. Patrick’s Day during the Irish Rebellion in 1798. Before then, Ireland was known for the color blue since it featured prominently in the royal court and on ancient Irish flags.

During the rebellion against Britain, however, Irish soldiers chose to wear green—the color that most contrasted the red British uniforms—and sang, “The Wearing of the Green.” This firmly established the link between Ireland and the color green.

Pull Quote
St. Patrick's Day no more to keep,
His color can't be seen,
For there's a bloody law again
The wearing of the green.
- Verse from “The Wearing of the Green”