<p>National Geographic is exploring our complex relationship with what we eat and how we’ll feed the world without harming the planet, in a Society-wide initiative called <a href="http://food.nationalgeographic.com/">the Future of Food</a>.</p><p>To find out where our food comes from, we visited <a href="http://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/aquaculture/">experimental farms that grow giant Japanese scallops</a> off the coast of Canada’s Vancouver Island, tagged along with the <a href="http://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/evolution-of-diet/">world’s last full-time hunter-gatherers</a>, and met scientists who are<a href="http://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/green-revolution/"> genetically engineering cassava plants</a> to resist common viruses.</p><p>Frank Reese, shown above, raises and sells heritage breeds of turkeys on the Good Shepherd Ranch, near Lindsborg, Kansas. He’s famous in the food industry for his rare breeds in a market focused on commercial breeds. Reese is one of many farmers we’ve met over the past year as part of our food coverage. (<a href="http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2014/05/30/good-shepherd-ranch-gene-pool-chickens/">Meet Frank Reese and see video from his farm.</a>)</p><p>From the sugarcane farmers in Mozambique to fishermen on the Sulu Sea in the southwest region of the Philippines, here’s a collection of some of the best photographs from the series so far.</p><p>You can contribute to our food coverage by uploading food photos to Your Shot using <a href="http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/tags/yourplate/">#yourplate</a>. <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/10/pictures/141010-world-plate-your-shot-gallery-ngfood/">(See a gallery of Your Shot submitted photos of dishes from around the world.)</a></p><p><em>—By Angie McPherson, photo gallery by Sarah Leen and Nicole Werbeck</em></p>

Birds of a Different Feather

National Geographic is exploring our complex relationship with what we eat and how we’ll feed the world without harming the planet, in a Society-wide initiative called the Future of Food.

To find out where our food comes from, we visited experimental farms that grow giant Japanese scallops off the coast of Canada’s Vancouver Island, tagged along with the world’s last full-time hunter-gatherers, and met scientists who are genetically engineering cassava plants to resist common viruses.

Frank Reese, shown above, raises and sells heritage breeds of turkeys on the Good Shepherd Ranch, near Lindsborg, Kansas. He’s famous in the food industry for his rare breeds in a market focused on commercial breeds. Reese is one of many farmers we’ve met over the past year as part of our food coverage. (Meet Frank Reese and see video from his farm.)

From the sugarcane farmers in Mozambique to fishermen on the Sulu Sea in the southwest region of the Philippines, here’s a collection of some of the best photographs from the series so far.

You can contribute to our food coverage by uploading food photos to Your Shot using #yourplate. (See a gallery of Your Shot submitted photos of dishes from around the world.)

—By Angie McPherson, photo gallery by Sarah Leen and Nicole Werbeck

Photograph by Jim Richardson, National Geographic

Our Favorite Photos of the Food We Eat, From Plow to Plate

From sugarcane farmers in Mozambique to fishermen on the Philippines's Sulu Sea, here's a collection of some of the best photographs from our Future of Food series.

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