Filmmaker Taylor Graham and his team embark on a mission by kayak to document Arizona's submerged Glen Canyon. On their 350-mile paddle, they set out to see the how water management challenges in the Colorado River Basin played out along the river. Along the trip, which they undertook as part of a National Geographic Society-supported project, they spoke with activists, archeologists, scientists, government officials, and members of the Navajo Nation, all of whom weighed in on the far-reaching effects of the dam that flooded Glen Canyon and created Lake Powell. @taylorbuzzell http://www.glencanyonrediscovered.org/ https://www.americanrivers.org/ The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the world and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. To submit a film for consideration, please email sfs@natgeo.com. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

In 1963, the floodgates closed on the newly constructed Glen Canyon Dam near the Arizona-Utah border, locking the waters of the Colorado River behind its concrete face. The water pooled behind the dam, slowly filling in the vast canyon—and the maze of slot canyons and grottoes feathering around its edges. Only a few years later, Glen Canyon was transformed from the sandstone cradle of the tumbling Colorado River into the deep, still, ~250-square mile Lake Powell.

Environmentalists and native communities mourned the loss of the gorgeous and culturally significant places drowned under the new lake. Over the years, Glen Canyon’s lost splendor took on a nearly mythical status, and river acolytes held out hope that they would

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