Celia Vangrieken and Yadira Martinez look over a pond that provides water for the community

This sacred bean saved an indigenous clan from climate calamity

Years after coal mining and a prolonged drought sapped their water and food supplies, an indigenous community in Colombia’s Guajira desert is rebounding thanks to a resilient legume.

Celia Vangrieken and Yadira Martinez look over a pond that provides limited water for a Wayuu community in Parenstu, Colombia.

Photograph by Adriana Loureiro Fernandez

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