Watch Becoming Cousteau, a National Geographic documentary streaming on Disney+ starting November 24.

“The underwater world is with us, around us, close to us, at all times,” says photographer Patrick Baker, and he should know, having spent more than 50 years documenting it. Since the 19th century, underwater photography has become both an art form and scientific tool that's brought our diverse, sprawling oceans into full view, and with it have come new innovations to bring the unknown into focus. 

From a 35mm Calypso camera envisioned by marine explorer Jacques Cousteau to NASA’s FluidCam created by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Ved Chirayath, our ever-evolving camera technology puts us closer to this mesmerizing world and reminds us of its importance.

Dive deep into the world of Animals, Science, and Natural History in our original video series Nat Geo Explores.

The National Geographic Society, committed to illuminating and protecting the wonder of our world, has funded Explorer Ved Chirayath's work. Learn more about the Society’s support of Explorers.

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