Krithi Karanth: Finding the balance between human communities and nature

National Geographic Explorer Krithi Karanth is studying human-wildlife interactions & conservation across Asia on a macro-level.

Krithi Karanth is chief conservation scientist at the Centre for Wildlife Studies, as well as an adjunct faculty member at Duke University and India’s National Centre for Biological Sciences. 

Karanth has been involved in scientific research and conservation in Asia for the last 21 years, focusing on the human dimensions of conservation. 

She has conducted macro-level studies assessing patterns of species distributions and extinctions, impacts of wildlife tourism, consequences of voluntary resettlement, land use change and understanding human-wildlife interactions. 

Karanth has published more than 90 scientific and popular articles and a children's book. 

She served on the editorial boards of Conservation Biology, Conservation Letters and Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

Throughout her career, Karanth has mentored over 120 young scientists and engaged more than 500 citizen science volunteers.


This Explorer's work is funded by the National Geographic Society
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