How to grocery shop to help the environment

Buying vegan or vegetarian food isn’t the only way. These three small changes can also make a big difference, says a recent study.

Going vegan or vegetarian is one way to decrease your diet’s impact on greenhouse gas emissions—but it isn’t the only way. A recent Purdue University study suggests that smaller tweaks can make a difference too, while improving your health.

After analyzing the 2010 grocery purchases of more than 57,000 U.S. households, Purdue researchers found 71 percent could shrink their food carbon footprint by making three changes:

Avoiding foods with high calorie counts and low nutritional value can reduce the total carbon footprint of U.S. household food consumption by nearly 10 percent. Items like candy, soda, and packaged snacks take more ingredients and more processing, which translates to higher environmental impacts.

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