4 ways to give the planet a summer break

Enjoying the outdoors shouldn’t imperil the Earth. Give Mother Nature a vacation with easy-on-the-environment ideas.

Made into shades: It’s estimated that discarded fishing gear accounts for more than half the total weight of plastics floating in the ocean. Search online for “recycled sunglasses” and you’ll find several options made from recovered ocean debris, including “ghost” fishing nets that were lost or abandoned.

Block out toxins: Protect your skin and marine life at the same time. Avoid sunscreen ingredients such as oxybenzone and octinoxate. When they end up in water, they can harm corals and other ocean dwellers. More ideas: Seek shade—and find additional guidance at oceanservice.noaa.gov/sunscreen.

Dishware from plants: Whether it’s an afternoon in the park or a patio party, avoid single-use items, which account for half of all plastic produced. If you do opt for disposable products, consider those made from palm leaves or fast-growing bamboo, and reuse them a few times when possible. A keyword search for “plant-based dishware” yields options for most needs and budgets.

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