Doctors’ orders: watch what you’re eating when

From salmon burgers for breakfast to spinach for a headache, these M.D.’s say eating the right foods at the right times is the key to health.

Michael Roizen, M.D., is chief wellness officer at the Cleveland Clinic and a New York Times best-selling author. Michael Crupain, M.D., is chief medical officer for television’s The Dr. Oz Show. Both have long linked a better diet with better health. But their new book, What to Eat When, says emerging science confirms that “when you eat is as essential as what you eat for maintaining a good weight, preventing and curing some diseases, and living a long, energetic, and happy life.”

Ahead of the book’s December release, the doctor-authors answered questions for National Geographic.

Tell us about the science behind your approach to eating.
We’re all familiar with our biological clocks—the circadian rhythm that sends out chemical signals at certain times to help us wake, sleep, and do other activities. Well, we also have a food clock with a similar purpose: to sync our consumption of food with chemical reactions in the body.

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