Map Shows Why Critically Endangered Rhinos Struggle to Survive

Fragmented habitat makes it hard for Sumatran rhinos to procreate and thrive. National Geographic is supporting a conservation effort that may help.

Mating is a challenge for Sumatran rhinos. The critically endangered animals live in four isolated regions scattered across 10,000 square miles of steep, dense forest, and males rarely venture far. A new effort—led by the Indonesian government and supported by an alliance of conservation organizations, including the National Geographic Society—aims to help the species rebound by consolidating the fragmented populations and expanding breeding programs to several rhino sanctuaries within Indonesia. To help save the Sumatran Rhino visit SumatranRhinoRescue.org.

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