Think you know the planet? ‘Welcome to Earth’ will test that.

In print, online, and in a broadcast series hosted by actor Will Smith, scientists and explorers journey to extreme places and explain curious phenomena.

Who hasn’t paused to appreciate a beautiful sunset? Or listen to the wind rustling through the trees? By the sea, there are mesmerizing tides and a salt-air scent; in the sky, dazzling formations of birds, and endless stars.

Behind all those experiences are the natural forces that power our planet. They give rise to the sounds, smells, and sights we perceive; the life that swarms around us, moving at every speed. Those phenomena are the focus of this special issue and of a six-part National Geographic television series, starring Will Smith and available on Disney+.

In print and broadcast media and on digital and social platforms, this project shares one title: Welcome to Earth. That’s an oddly appropriate greeting, addressing us as if we’re strangers to a place we think we know well. But we may find that we don’t know it well at all, as Welcome to Earth invites us to look at the planet in new ways.

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