‘The nets were swaying from side to side. If you missed your jump, you were into the sea and gone.’

Morton Waitzman, U.S. Army veteran

Robert Lyall, National Geographic Studios

Morton Waitzman wasn’t even off his D-Day troop transport ship when he witnessed death for the first time in his young life.

“It was about 4 or 5 in the morning, June 6, 1944,” he recalls. “The weather was miserable. We had to climb down these nets and jump into an infantry landing craft.

“The nets were swaying from side to side. If you missed your jump, you were into the sea and gone.”

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