Human brain with zombie cells

‘Zombie cells’ could hold the secret to Alzheimer’s cure

In an aging brain, cells that stop working yet refuse to die may play a role in dementia—making them key targets for future medicines.

Senescent cells—also called zombie cells (background image)—in regions of the human brain (inset) are crucial for memory. The link between these cells and Alzheimer's Disease was discovered by Miranda Orr and her team at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine.
Photo Illustration using Images by Robert Clark, (brain) and Lidan Wu, Nanostring COSMX
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