How did a WWII campaign endure to inspire today?

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A newspaper column about her turned into a 1942 popular song, and other women later sat for a Norman Rockwell portrait (above, paired with the Michelangelo image he modeled it after) and for the Rosie posters, which have rebounded in America’s consciousness the past four decades.



Like many women of impact on history, the original Rosie the Riveter was more than a two-dimensional character. Heiress of one fortune, married into another, Walter spent the later part of her life on another patriotic effort: bankrolling public TV documentaries and shows that round out the education of fellow citizens.



And of that nickname bestowed upon her by that newspaper columnist and the musicians who made her

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