They capture the apocalyptic skies

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For photo editor Dominque Hildebrand, who covers the environment, it was important to make clear that this event was more than a freak occurrence. She pulled strong images by Gabrielle Lurie (below) and Scott Strazzante that “showcased both the normalcy of daily life and the foreboding impacts of climate change."

And Dominique included a few images that “just really speak to the power and scale of the fires.” Below, smoke from the wildfires bathes Sausalito’s Marin Headlands in a deep red glow as Thomas Spratley (right) and Paulo Santos visit.

As citizens marveled at the orange skies overhead, Stuart was heading north to the frontlines—and the fast-moving Berry Creek fire (below). Not only has Stuart spent the past eight years documenting California’s

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