"I moved out of my apartment after I finished grad school in 2017 and haven't had a conventional 'home' ever since," writes Your Shot photographer Kim Nesbitt. "I've been fortunate enough to stay with friends and family, but since I left the apartment, home has always been where I am sleeping that night. When I travel, I often pitch a tent, and that tent becomes home. My home for a few nights was at 12,000 feet in the Himalayas, pictured."
"I moved out of my apartment after I finished grad school in 2017 and haven't had a conventional 'home' ever since," writes Your Shot photographer Kim Nesbitt. "I've been fortunate enough to stay with friends and family, but since I left the apartment, home has always been where I am sleeping that night. When I travel, I often pitch a tent, and that tent becomes home. My home for a few nights was at 12,000 feet in the Himalayas, pictured."
Photograph by Kim Nesbitt, National Geographic Your Shot

Your best photos of the week, April 26, 2019

Each week, our editors choose stunning photos submitted by members of Your Shot, National Geographic's photo community.

While curating this week’s best photos from the Your Shot photo community, I tried to notice any recurring visual themes. Almost immediately, I recognized how this week’s photographers used shapes in their photographs. Whether through light, leading lines, reflections, or patterns, each photographer used the shapes in their frame to compose a moment.

The square format Francesco Truono used in his street photograph of a woman in the sunlight struck me when I first saw it in daily edits. His choice of a square crop already used shape in his composition, but then he also used the existing railing within his photograph as a visual element. Then the sunlight created a contrasting shadow across the woman’s face that added another shape within the frame.

Despite enjoying math in high school, I absolutely despised geometry (and statistics, but that’s another story). I could never piece together why we were learning about logical statements in geometry. It still doesn’t make sense. What does make sense to me nowadays is the power of geometry within a photograph. Photographers who find shapes within their frames and wait for the light to strike the right angle can make some of the most compelling photographs, even with the simplest of scenes. Sometimes less is more, so keep your eyes peeled for shapes within a scene and compose around them. You never know what you might see!

Associate Photo Editor Kristen McNicholas looks at daily uploads from Your Shot, starting each day by sifting through thousands of photographs. This series is a selection of her favorites from the past week.

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