Photograph by Derek Zhang, National Geographic Your Shot

Your best photos of the week, November 23, 2018

Each week, our editors choose stunning photos submitted by members of Your Shot, National Geographic's photo community.

It was Thanksgiving this week here in the United States, a holiday that historically (and inaccurately depicted) as when Native Americans and European settlers peacefully shared a meal together. You can read more about the holiday here but nonetheless, it is a time that folks in the United States eat a lot of food, watch football or a parade and spend time with loved ones.

I have much to be thankful for from the past year, especially the Your Shot community. Not many folks get to say they love their jobs but I do! Bonus points that I get to look at thousands of incredible photographs every day, build relationships and help photographers tap into their creativity and make their best images. I’m thankful every day for the Your Shot community welcoming me into their lives. It’s an honor.

While this might be a time we all love to tune out from social media and the internet (something that I definitely support we all do from time to time), I encourage you to keep your cameras with you to document these times with your family and friends, or just the quiet evenings in your apartment.

There is a misconception that one has to travel to the opposite corners of the Earth to make interesting pictures but the simple reality is that the best pictures can be found right in your preverbal backyard. Remember, just follow the light and the photograph will follow. No matter what holiday from which corner of the world, I always look forward to seeing the intimate celebrations from within your home.

Associate Photo Editor Kristen McNicholas looks at daily uploads from Your Shot, starting each day by sifting through thousands of photographs. This series is a selection of her favorites from the past week.

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