The moon almost totally eclipses the sun during a near total solar eclipse as seen from Salem, Oregon.
The moon almost totally eclipses the sun during a near total solar eclipse as seen from Salem, Oregon.
Photograph by Don Ryan, AP

The Most Mesmerizing Photos of the Eclipse

Whether or not you're in the path of totality, see how people around the country are celebrating the total solar eclipse.

We will be updating this story with new photos throughout the day.

It's one of the most talked about astronomical events of the century—a total solar eclipse.

Just after 9 a.m. PDT, a solar eclipse will make its way across the continental U.S., from Oregon to South Carolina. Viewers within the path of totality—a thin, 70-mile-wide swath—will see the moon completely eclipse the sun. Those to the north and south of the path of totality will see partial eclipses. (Learn how to watch the solar eclipse from anywhere.)

This rare alignment, in which only the sun's corona is visible, hasn't been seen across the continental US since 1918, and a record number of people are flocking to states where they can see totality.

Unable to see the spectacle in person? No problem. Follow along in real-time with our photos—some of the first to show this incredible cosmic event—and watch National Geographic's live coverage of the eclipse.

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