The Best Photos From Your Shot: Drama, Drama Underwater

Every day here at National Geographic, our photo editors look through somewhere between 4,000 and 8,000 images that are uploaded to our photo community, Your Shot. Of those images, 12 are selected to shine in what we call the Daily Dozen. And from those photos, only one is chosen. And by chosen, I mean voted on by you, the community. That photo receives the Top Shot honor.

In this group of top-voted images from the weeks of May 25 to June 5, I saw two themes: dramatic light and underwater shots. Sometimes both. Images showing deep dives starring mobula rays, a humpback whale, and a Portuguese man-of-war; the stunning light play from an impending storm and the golden hour; and the way a photographer captures light illuminating a Himba girl’s face or silhouetting a young Darth Vader are anything but subtle.

See more featured content from Your Shot on our Editors’ Spotlight, and be a part of our photo community—where you can upload images, participate in assignments, and even attend meetups—by joining Your Shot. And don’t forget to help your favorite image from the Daily Dozen become the Top Shot by voting every weekday.

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