The Best Photos From Your Shot: Volcanoes and More Volcanoes!

Every day here at National Geographic, our photo editors look through somewhere between 4,000 and 8,000 images that are uploaded to our photo community, Your Shot. Of those images, 12 are selected to shine in what we call the Daily Dozen. And from THOSE, only one is chosen. And by chosen, I mean voted on by you, the community. That photo receives the honor of “Top Shot.”

We’re featuring the Top Shots from the past two weeks—the best of the best. And when you put them together, often patterns emerge. Over the past few weeks, we’ve seen a lot of images of Chile’s Calbuco volcano erupting, so much that they make up three of the past ten Top Shots. Here they are. Feast your eyes on the Top Shots from April 27 through May 8.

Our Your Shot editors are so into volcanoes that they descended on Hawaii’s Volcanoes National Park for the BioBlitz on May 15-16, along with hundreds of citizen scientists.

Also, see more featured content from Your Shot on the Editors’ Spotlight, and be a part of our photo community where you can upload images, participate in assignments, and even attend meetups, by joining Your Shot.

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