<p><strong>A blast of white-hot <a id="rkvw" title="lightning" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/lightning-profile.html">lightning</a> crackles over <a id="z34g" title="Iceland volcano" href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/geopedia/Iceland#Land of Fire and Ice">Iceland</a>'s Eyjafjallajökull <a id="l05l" title="Iceland volcano" href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/geopedia/Iceland#Land of Fire and Ice">volcano</a> on Sunday. Clouds of volcanic ash from Eyjafjallajökull have <a id="cu_y" title="snarled European air traffic for nearly a week" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/04/100415-volcanic-ash-cancels-flights-airports-airline-europe-iceland-volcano/">snarled European air traffic for nearly a week</a>.</strong></p><p><a title="Your Shot" href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/your-shot/your-shot">National Geographic Your Shot</a> submitter Peter Vancoillie took the photograph from about 18 miles (30 kilometers) away from the volcanic lightning storm, which not "unlike a regular old thunderstorm," said <a id="yyqr" title="Martin Uman" href="http://www.uman.ece.ufl.edu/">Martin Uman</a>, a lightning expert at the University of Florida in Gainesville.</p><p>The same ingredients are present: water droplets, ice, and possibly hail—all interacting with each other and with particles, in this case ash from the eruptions, to cause electrical charging, Uman said. (See <a id="am40" title="pictures of the Iceland volcano's ash plume" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/04/photogalleries/100415-iceland-volcanic-ash-flights/#iceland-volcano-ash-side-view_18986_600x450.jpg">pictures of the Iceland volcano's ash plume</a>.)</p><p>The volcanic-lightning pictures are "really very sensational," Uman said. "Somebody ought to be up there with an HD movie camera—it's ready for the IMAX theater."<br><br><em>—Christine Dell'Amore</em></p>

White-Hot Show at Iceland Volcano

A blast of white-hot lightning crackles over Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano on Sunday. Clouds of volcanic ash from Eyjafjallajökull have snarled European air traffic for nearly a week.

National Geographic Your Shot submitter Peter Vancoillie took the photograph from about 18 miles (30 kilometers) away from the volcanic lightning storm, which not "unlike a regular old thunderstorm," said Martin Uman, a lightning expert at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

The same ingredients are present: water droplets, ice, and possibly hail—all interacting with each other and with particles, in this case ash from the eruptions, to cause electrical charging, Uman said. (See pictures of the Iceland volcano's ash plume.)

The volcanic-lightning pictures are "really very sensational," Uman said. "Somebody ought to be up there with an HD movie camera—it's ready for the IMAX theater."

—Christine Dell'Amore

Photograph by Peter Vancoillie, Your Shot

Iceland Volcano Pictures: Lightning Adds Flash to Ash

Intense lightning storms mixed with ash clouds to electrify the night sky over Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano on Sunday.

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