National Geographic 360º Energy Diet: Call for Participants

National Geographic 360º Energy Diet: Call for Participants

National Geographic's 360º Energy Diet features households around the world as they attempt to reduce their carbon footprints. For eight weeks, participants will try to drop as much excess "weight" as they can by making measurable changes in six areas of their lives: home efficiency, transportation, store purchases, water use, waste reduction and general lifestyle. Each household will be featured in a blog about the challenge at The Great Energy Challenge website, part of NationalGeographic.com.

Households will receive a set of action items in six different areas, each worth a certain number of points. The more changes a household can make, the more points it can earn. Examples of tasks include, but are not limited to:

· Tallying stats

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