<p><em>This gallery is part of a <a id="w78h" title="special National Geographic News series" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/clean_water_crisis.html">special National Geographic News series</a> on global water issues.</em></p><p>The next crayfish boil in Shoal Creek, Tennessee, could be a big one. Scientists working there have found a new species of crayfish that is meatier than all of its competitors.</p><p><em>Barbicambarus simmonsi </em>is nearly 5 inches long—almost twice the size of a typical crayfish found in the region. <em><br></em></p><p>Aquatic biologists from the <a id="mmy8" title="University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana" href="http://illinois.edu/">University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign</a> and <a id="gmv3" title="Eastern Kentucky University" href="http://www.eku.edu/">Eastern Kentucky University</a> found the unusual new species hiding under rocks in a deep part of the creek. Species of the <em>Barbicambarus</em> genus have uncommon "bearded" antennae covered with fine bristles that enhance their sensory capacity.</p><p>The new species is described in a paper in the <em>Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington</em>.</p><p><em>--Tasha Eichenseher</em></p>

A Giant Among Crayfish

This gallery is part of a special National Geographic News series on global water issues.

The next crayfish boil in Shoal Creek, Tennessee, could be a big one. Scientists working there have found a new species of crayfish that is meatier than all of its competitors.

Barbicambarus simmonsi is nearly 5 inches long—almost twice the size of a typical crayfish found in the region.

Aquatic biologists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Eastern Kentucky University found the unusual new species hiding under rocks in a deep part of the creek. Species of the Barbicambarus genus have uncommon "bearded" antennae covered with fine bristles that enhance their sensory capacity.

The new species is described in a paper in the Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington.

--Tasha Eichenseher

Photograph courtesy L. Brian Stauffer, University of Illinois

Photos: New Giant "Bearded" Crayfish Species

Scientists have found a unique new species of crayfish in Tennessee and Alabama that is twice the size of other crayfish in the southeastern U.S.

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