<p><strong>An unidentified <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/egypt-guide/">Egyptian</a> mummy dated back to between 688 and 332 B.C. slides into a CT scanner as part of a recent study of ancient disease.</strong></p><p>The mummy was among 52 from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo subjected to medical scanning by a joint U.S.-Egyptian team. The tests revealed that almost half of the dead have clogged arteries associated with a condition called atherosclerosis, which can lead to heart attack or stroke.</p><p>One of the mummies, a princess who died about 3,500 years ago, is now the oldest known case of the arterial disease, the researchers say.</p><p>"If the princess was in a time machine and I was to see her now, I would tell her to lay off the fat, take plenty of exercise, then schedule her for heart surgery," said study co-leader Gregory Thomas, a professor of cardiology at the<a href="http://www.uci.edu/"> University of California, Irvine</a>. "She would require a double bypass." <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/04/110415-ancient-egypt-mummies-princess-heart-disease-health-science/"></a></p><p><strong><a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/04/110415-ancient-egypt-mummies-princess-heart-disease-health-science/">Read more about the Egyptian princess, the oldest known sufferer of heart disease &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p><p><em>—With reporting by James Owen </em></p>

Mummy in the Machine

An unidentified Egyptian mummy dated back to between 688 and 332 B.C. slides into a CT scanner as part of a recent study of ancient disease.

The mummy was among 52 from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo subjected to medical scanning by a joint U.S.-Egyptian team. The tests revealed that almost half of the dead have clogged arteries associated with a condition called atherosclerosis, which can lead to heart attack or stroke.

One of the mummies, a princess who died about 3,500 years ago, is now the oldest known case of the arterial disease, the researchers say.

"If the princess was in a time machine and I was to see her now, I would tell her to lay off the fat, take plenty of exercise, then schedule her for heart surgery," said study co-leader Gregory Thomas, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Irvine. "She would require a double bypass."

Read more about the Egyptian princess, the oldest known sufferer of heart disease >>

—With reporting by James Owen

Photograph courtesy Michael Miyamoto

Egypt Mummy Pictures: Scans Show Ancient Heart Disease

Recent scans of 52 mummies revealed at least half the dead had clogged arteries—including a princess with the oldest known heart disease.

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