<p><a id="internal-source-marker_0.6997266063776277" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/ecuador-guide/">Ecuador</a>'s <a href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/map-machine#s=h&amp;c=-1.474065265973837, -78.45216751098634&amp;z=12">Tungurahua volcano (satellite map)</a>—seen here from the town of Cotalo—shot truck-size boulders nearly a mile (1.6 kilometers) away Friday, prompting the evacuation of at least 300 people, according to the Associated Press.</p><p>Tungurahua—"throat of fire" in the indigenous Quechua language—sits high in the Andes mountains, about 80 miles (130 kilometers) south of Quito, Ecuador's densely populated capital.</p><p>Eruptions are nothing new for the 16,500-foot (5,000-meter) <a href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/volcano-profile/">volcano</a>, which roared back to life in 1999 after nearly 80 years of dormancy. (Related: <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/110310-most-dangerous-volcanoes-magma-chamber-dormant-science/">"'Sleeping' Volcanoes Can wake Up Faster Than Thought."</a>)</p><p><em>—Korena Di Roma</em></p>

Tungurahua Volcano

Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano (satellite map)—seen here from the town of Cotalo—shot truck-size boulders nearly a mile (1.6 kilometers) away Friday, prompting the evacuation of at least 300 people, according to the Associated Press.

Tungurahua—"throat of fire" in the indigenous Quechua language—sits high in the Andes mountains, about 80 miles (130 kilometers) south of Quito, Ecuador's densely populated capital.

Eruptions are nothing new for the 16,500-foot (5,000-meter) volcano, which roared back to life in 1999 after nearly 80 years of dormancy. (Related: "'Sleeping' Volcanoes Can wake Up Faster Than Thought.")

—Korena Di Roma

Photograph by Dolores Ochoa, AP

Volcano Pictures: "Throat of Fire" Erupts

Active for years, Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano—"throat of fire" in a local language—exploded especially violently Friday.

Read This Next

The science behind seasonal depression
These 3,000-year-old relics were torched and buried—but why?
How the Holocaust happened in plain sight

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet