<p><strong>A year ago this Sunday, a magnitude 9 <a href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/earthquake-profile.html">earthquake</a>—and the record-breaking, <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2011-04-24-Japan-record-tsunami-waves.htm">up to ten-story-tall</a> tsunami it spawned—killed some 20,000 people in Kisenuma (pictured the day after the <a href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/tsunami-profile/">tsunami</a>) and other cities in <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/japan-guide/">Japan</a>.</strong></p><p>It was one for the history books, for sure, but that doesn't mean it couldn't happen elsewhere. In fact, experts say at least six places worldwide have the geologic makings to become the next Japan.</p><p>What's more, the next mega-tsunami site may have it even worse.</p><p>After all, some 90 percent of the 200,000 people who lived in the path of the Japanese tsunami found safety during the short interval between the earthquake and the wave—a survival rate Oregon State University hazards-outreach specialist <a href="http://seagrant.oregonstate.edu/people/patrick-corcoran">Patrick Corcoran</a> attributes to Japan's history of earthquake preparedness.</p><p>(See more <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/110311-tsunami-earthquake-japan-hawaii-science-world-waves/">Japan earthquake and tsunami pictures and news</a>.)</p><p><em>—Richard A. Lovett</em></p>

Japan Tsunami Aftermath

A year ago this Sunday, a magnitude 9 earthquake—and the record-breaking, up to ten-story-tall tsunami it spawned—killed some 20,000 people in Kisenuma (pictured the day after the tsunami) and other cities in Japan.

It was one for the history books, for sure, but that doesn't mean it couldn't happen elsewhere. In fact, experts say at least six places worldwide have the geologic makings to become the next Japan.

What's more, the next mega-tsunami site may have it even worse.

After all, some 90 percent of the 200,000 people who lived in the path of the Japanese tsunami found safety during the short interval between the earthquake and the wave—a survival rate Oregon State University hazards-outreach specialist Patrick Corcoran attributes to Japan's history of earthquake preparedness.

(See more Japan earthquake and tsunami pictures and news.)

—Richard A. Lovett

Photograph from European Pressphoto Agency

Photos: Where Will Next Mega-Tsunami Hit? (Japan Quake Anniversary)

One year after the great Japan earthquake and tsunami, at least six other places worldwide are vulnerable to giant killer waves.

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