Hotels Save Energy With a Push to Save Water

A new U.S. government program challenges lodgings to save water and energy.

In the United States, households typically pay about $2 for every 1,000 gallons of water (53 cents per cubic meter). That's a cheap rate among developed nations, about 40 percent less than in Germany and 30 percent less than in Japan.

Dominguez added that water's relatively low price compared with the cost of energy has made it harder to get companies excited about conserving it. But in fact, as Caesars has realized in recent years, saving water can actually lead to savings in energy, because of the intimate connection between the two vital resources. And Dominguez says hotels are uniquely suited to take advantage of the possibilities.

"For us in the hospitality business, water is a big part of what

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