From Slushy to Serene, Our Favorite Pictures of Winter Weather

With record snow and cold hitting parts of the United States even before winter officially arrives, we decided to dig out our favorite photos of winter weather. (Read why it's getting cold and snowy so early.) Sit back, relax, and maybe heat up of mug of hot cocoa as you browse through some spectacular shots of ice and snow from the National Geographic photo archive.

<p>In the picture, from the 1920s, clouds of snow billow over a train of mountaineers as they trek through the Swiss Alps.</p>

Blizzards All the Way

In the picture, from the 1920s, clouds of snow billow over a train of mountaineers as they trek through the Swiss Alps.

Photograph by Jean Gaberell, National Geographic

With record snow and cold hitting parts of the United States even before winter officially arrives, we decided to dig out our favorite photos of winter weather. 

Sit back, relax, and maybe heat up of mug of hot cocoa as you browse through some spectacular shots of ice and snow from the National Geographic photo archive.

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