Blizzard of Nor'Easters No Surprise, Thanks to Climate Change

More extreme storms are expected to fall on the Northeast as climate changes.

TV meteorologists may be calling it Winter Storm Juno, but climate scientists have a different name for the "once-in-a-century" blizzard that's expected to blanket the U.S. East Coast from New Jersey to Maine starting on Monday.

They call it completely predictable.

"Big snowfall, big rainstorms, we've been saying this for years," says climate scientist Don Wuebbles of the University of Illinois in Urbana. "More very large events becoming more common is what you would expect with climate change, particularly in the Northeast."

The Northeast is the big winner in the "extreme precipitation" sweepstakes dealt out by global warming, with the region seeing the biggest uptick in the severity of the most severe blizzards or rainstorms across the United States.

Amid canceled flights

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