Find the Planets in This Image of a Young Solar System

The image above is not an illustration. If your eyes could detect the long wavelengths between radio and infrared, and were sharp enough to resolve structures around a star 450 light-years away, you might see something like that.

The psychedelic swirl is actually a dusty disk of debris surrounding the young, sunlike star HL Tau. Only about 1 million years old, this star — and that disk — have been captured in the process of birthing planets. It’s the most detailed image of planetary genesis shot so far, and was made with a cluster of telescopes in the southern hemisphere called the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.

Normally, planets grow from the swirling mass of gas and dust

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