Beauty in the right eye of the beholder – finch chooses better mates with its right eye

It’s said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but that’s only half-true for the Gouldian finch. Jennifer Templeton from Knox College, Illinois has found that these beautiful birds only display their famous fussiness over mates if they’re looking with their right eye. If the right is shut, and the left eye is open, the birds have more catholic tastes. As Templeton writes, “Beauty, therefore, is in the right eye of the beholder for these songbirds.”

The Gouldian finch, found in northern Australia, looks like a bird painted by Gauguin. Its palette includes a purple chest, yellow belly, green wings and cyan highlights. But it’s the head that really matters. They come in red or black (there’s a very

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